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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! My new (used) dart came with the white cloth seats which I promised myself I would be able to keep clean, but a few thousand miles later and I'm seeing dirt spots on the drivers seat. Any ideas on how to clean the white cloth seats at home? I'd appreciate any help!
 
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First try using a damp microfiber towel; works wonders. If that doesn't work, go to Home Depot or Lowe's and pick up a bottle of Folex. Home Depot sells a larger bottle. To use: simply mist the area, allow to work 1-2 minutes, mist again and blot with a towel. Although rinsing is not required with Folex, I highly recommend using a damp microfiber towel and blot the area. If these methods do not work, let me know and I will guide you to a resolution.
 

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With that out of the way, let's talk fabric protectants. Once you have cleaned fabric and rinsed the fibers, I highly recommend using a fabric guard. Regardless of what brand you use, how you apply it is what determines how effective it is. My personal two favorite products are 303 High Tech Fabric Guard or Duragloss #341 Convertible Fabric Restorer. The process:

1) Clean, rinse, and allow fibers to be protected to fully dry
2) Using a hair dryer or heat gun, heat a small 12'' x 12'' area (roughly) to at least 85 degress F, not much hotter
3) Spray section adequately and allow a few minutes so the fibers soak up protectant, immediately wipe away overspray from other material
4) Using a low setting on hair dryer or heat gun, "bake in" the fabric protectant until area is dry
5) Once all fabric has been cleaned, treated, and "baked in", park vehicle in sun, and allow it to sit overnight to fully cure
6) Repeat application if desired

Please keep in mind that you want to use low settings to avoid melting or damaging fabric or surrounding material. Always wipe overspray from anything other than fabric.
 

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With that out of the way, let's talk fabric protectants. Once you have cleaned fabric and rinsed the fibers, I highly recommend using a fabric guard. Regardless of what brand you use, how you apply it is what determines how effective it is. My personal two favorite products are 303 High Tech Fabric Guard or Duragloss #341 Convertible Fabric Restorer. The process:

1) Clean, rinse, and allow fibers to be protected to fully dry
2) Using a hair dryer or heat gun, heat a small 12'' x 12'' area (roughly) to at least 85 degress F, not much hotter
3) Spray section adequately and allow a few minutes so the fibers soak up protectant, immediately wipe away overspray from other material
4) Using a low setting on hair dryer or heat gun, "bake in" the fabric protectant until area is dry
5) Once all fabric has been cleaned, treated, and "baked in", park vehicle in sun, and allow it to sit overnight to fully cure
6) Repeat application if desired

Please keep in mind that you want to use low settings to avoid melting or damaging fabric or surrounding material. Always wipe overspray from anything other than fabric.
great post, could be a sticky for how-to protect your seats
 

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stop farting lool... but seriously, try shampooing the seats either at a detail shop or using one of those rental machines and then apply some 3M SCOTCH GUARD or something comparable to that all over the cloth and that will help "repel" stubborn stains and I think it even waterproofs? maybe, i dont remember :p any carpet stain remover should work though for a spot treatment. Goodluck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow thanks for the detailed replies!!!! :D I will tackle the seats in the next few days and let you know how they turn out, and also the seat protectant sounds interesting I will also be doing that!
 
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