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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone had this problem before? I cant find anyone with all these problems at once! If I put it in drive it tell me to switch to neutral then drive or reverse but doesn't work. I can switch from park to neutral just fine. It locks in park and rolls in neutral. It also takes much longer to start now versus before this issue it I just bump the key and it would turn over and fire pretty quickly
125230
 

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Please scan for codes. Which engine and trans?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2014 dodge dart 1.4 aero with turbo. Will post the codes when I get them currently waiting on tow truck :cautious::cautious::mad::cry:. Got nervous at first because I've been putting the bushing recall off but since it's going to park and neutral I believe that isn't my issue
 

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The DDCT can be difficult to diagnose just by symptoms. Codes should really help. Very possibly the control solenoids or the clutches. Where are you towing it to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just did a global obd-II test with a genisys evo scanner I borrow from someone. it gave me ALOT of codes. This looks like a critical failure to me :ROFLMAO:. I dont even know where to start maybe with ABS fuses? :cry::cry: I have drivetrain and engine warranty but I dont know if it covers any of this
Text Screen Technology Electronics Electronic device
125233
 

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28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Transmission Control (TCM), C635 DDCT / Diagnosis and Testing

U11D1-00-ENGINE SPEED MESSAGE RATIONALITY


Theory of Operation

This diagnostic checks the validity, availability and rationality of the engine speed signal which is sent by the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) via a CAN message. The diagnostic checks the validity by performing a CRC and message counter check to be sure the engine speed signal is continuously updated by the PCM and that it has a valid value. The diagnostic also checks the availability by checking the received value is not equal to the Signal Not Available (SNA) default value. Then the diagnostic checks the rationality by comparing the received engine speed to the odd or even clutch speed and to the odd or even input shaft speed. The clutch speed is measured directly from the clutch speed sensor and the input shaft speed is calculated based upon the driveline speed multiplied by the actual gear ratio. Any reference to odd or even is directly related to the actual odd or even gear engaged.

•When Monitored for Signal Invalid or Missing
Ignition key is ON and the engine is not in cranking mode.

Power supply must be between 7 volts and 24 volts and the Main Micro Processor (MMP) supply diagnostics have not failed.

The Bus OFF failure is not present, the CAN communication between TCM and PCM is not lost, there are no dual port RAM faults and the CAN message was read at least once.

•When Monitored for Signal Not Rational – Engine Speed Check for Zero Value
Ignition key is ON, the engine is not in cranking mode, there is no shift in progress, a gear is engaged, the clutch speed is greater than a threshold 250 rpm.

Power supply must be between 7 volts and 24 volts and the Main micro processor (MMP) supply diagnostics are not in failure.

The clutch position sensor has no electrical faults and the clutch speed has no rationality faults.

The Bus OFF failure is not present, the CAN communication between TCM and PCM is not lost, there are no dual port RAM faults and the CAN message was read at least once.

•When Monitored for Signal Not Rational – Engine Speed Compared to Odd or Even Clutch Speed and Odd or Even Input Shaft Speed
Ignition key is ON, the engine ignition status is on, the engine is not in cranking mode, there is no shift in progress, the engine torque is less than 100 Nm or the clutch temperature is less than 170 °C, a gear is engaged and the clutch speed is stable for more than 1 sec.

Power supply must be between 7 volts and 24 volts and the Main micro processor (MMP) supply diagnostics are not in failure.

The driveline speed signal has no faults.

The Bus OFF failure is not present, the CAN communication between TCM and PCM is not lost, there are no dual port RAM faults and the CAN message was read at least once.

•Set Condition for Signal Invalid or Missing:
The failure is detected if at least one of the following malfunctions is verified:

1) CRC and Message Counter Check: A signal toggle bit and a signal parity bit are sent by the PCM within the CAN message. In order to be sure the message content is continuously updated, the value of the toggle bit changes from 0 to 1 and vice versa every two messages. In order to be sure the message is valid, the parity bit value is set so that the sum of the signal bits (ENG_RPM) of the message content plus the toggle bit plus the parity bit is an even number. If the toggle bit value does not change for a calibrated amount of time or the signal parity is not verified then DTC U11D1 is set.

2) Signal Not Available Check: When the signal is not available, the PCM sends an SNA default value to the TCM. If the TCM reads this value then DTC U11D1 is set.

•Set Condition for Signal not Rational - Engine Speed Check for Zero Value
The failure is detected if the received engine speed value is equal to 0 RPM then DTC U11D1 is set.

•Set Condition for Signal not Rational - Engine Speed Compared to Odd or Even Clutch Speed and Odd or Even Input Shaft Speed
The failure is detected if the difference between the received engine speed and the odd or even clutch speed is greater than 500 RPM and if the difference between the received engine speed and the odd or even input shaft speed is greater than 500 RPM then DTC U11D1 is set.


Possible Causes

PCM - INTERNAL ERROR
BCM CAN BUS DTCS PRESENT
TRANSMISSION CONTROL MODULE



28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

P0339-00-CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT

125234


Theory of Operation

The Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor circuits consist of a Powertrain Control Module (PCM) supplied 5-Volt reference circuit, low reference circuit and an output signal circuit. The CKP Sensor is an internally magnetic biased digital output integrated circuit sensing device. The sensor detects magnetic flux changes between the peaks and valleys of a tone wheel on the crankshaft. Each tooth on the tone wheel is evenly spaced with missing teeth used as a reference gap. The CKP Sensor produces an ON/OFF DC voltage of varying frequency, reference output pulses per crankshaft revolution. The frequency of the CKP Sensor output depends on the velocity of the crankshaft. The CKP Sensor sends a digital signal to the PCM , which represents an image of the crankshaft tone wheel. The PCM uses each CKP signal pulse to determine crankshaft speed and decodes the crankshaft tone wheel reference gap to identify crankshaft position. This information is then used to sequence the ignition timing and fuel injection events for the engine. The PCM also uses CKP Sensor output information to determine the crankshaft position relative to the camshaft. This information is used to identify cylinder misfires and to control the CMP actuator if equipped.


When Monitored and Set Conditions

When Monitored:

•This diagnostic runs with the engine cranking or running.


Set Conditions:

•When the CKP Sensor failure counter reaches 20.


Default Actions:

•MIL light will illuminate.


Possible Causes

5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)



28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

P0137-00-O2 SENSOR 1/2 CIRCUIT LOW

125235


Theory of Operation

The 4-Wire oxygen sensor is equipped with a galvanic battery that typically generates a voltage signal between 0.0 volts and 1.0 volts. The 4-Wire O2 Sensor also includes a heating element that keeps the sensor at proper operating temperature during all operating modes. Maintaining correct sensor temperature at all times allows the system to enter into closed loop operation sooner. Also, it allows the system to remain in closed loop operation during periods of extended idle.

A bias voltage in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) shifts the signal voltage to fluctuate between 2.5 volts and 3.5 volts, depending upon the oxygen content of the exhaust gas. When a large amount of oxygen is present (caused by a lean air/fuel mixture) the sensor produces a low voltage. When there is a lesser amount of oxygen present (caused by a rich air/fuel mixture) it produces a higher voltage. By monitoring the oxygen content and converting it to electrical voltage, the sensor acts as a rich-lean switch.

In Open Loop operation the PCM ignores input from the O2 sensors. In Closed Loop operation the PCM monitors the O2 sensor's input (along with other inputs) and adjusts the injector pulse width accordingly based on pre-programmed (fixed) values and inputs from other sensors. The PCM also compares upstream and downstream O2 Sensor inputs to calculate the catalytic convertor oxygen storage capacity and converter efficiency.


When Monitored and Set Conditions

When Monitored: This diagnostic runs continuously when the following conditions are met:

•With the engine running.
•O2 Sensor is in closed loop mode.


Set Conditions:

•The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects that the O2 Sensor 1/2 signal voltage is below the minimum calibrated threshold.


Default Actions:

•The MIL light will illuminate.


Possible Causes

O2 SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
O2 SENSOR 1/2 SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
O2 SENSOR 1/2 SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE O2 SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT
O2 SENSOR 1/2 SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE O2 SENSOR 1/2 HEATER CONTROL CIRCUIT
O2 SENSOR 1/2
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)




28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

P2096-00-DOWNSTREAM FUEL TRIM SYSTEM 1 LEAN

125236


Theory of Operation

The 4-Wire oxygen sensor is equipped with a galvanic battery that typically generates a voltage signal between 0.0 volts and 1.0 volts. The 4-Wire O2 Sensor also includes a heating element that keeps the sensor at proper operating temperature during all operating modes. Maintaining correct sensor temperature at all times allows the system to enter into closed loop operation sooner. Also, it allows the system to remain in closed loop operation during periods of extended idle.

A bias voltage in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) shifts the signal voltage to fluctuate between 2.5 volts and 3.5 volts, depending upon the oxygen content of the exhaust gas. When a large amount of oxygen is present (caused by a lean air/fuel mixture) the sensor produces a low voltage. When there is a lesser amount of oxygen present (caused by a rich air/fuel mixture) it produces a higher voltage. By monitoring the oxygen content and converting it to electrical voltage, the sensor acts as a rich-lean switch.

In Open Loop operation the PCM ignores input from the O2 sensors. In Closed Loop operation the PCM monitors the O2 sensor's input (along with other inputs) and adjusts the injector pulse width accordingly based on pre-programmed (fixed) values and inputs from other sensors. The PCM also compares upstream and downstream O2 Sensor inputs to calculate the catalytic convertor oxygen storage capacity and converter efficiency.


When Monitored and Set Conditions

When Monitored: This diagnostic runs when the following conditions are met:

•With the engine running in closed loop mode.
•Ambient/battery temperature above -6.7° C (20° F).
•Altitude below 2590.8 m (8500 ft).


Set Conditions:

•The conditions that cause this diagnostic to fail is when the Upstream O2 Sensor becomes biased from an exhaust leak, O2 Sensor contamination or some other extreme operating condition. The Downstream O2 Sensor is considered to be protected from extreme environments by the catalyst. The PCM monitors the Downstream O2 Sensor feedback control, called downstream fuel trim, to detect any shift in the Upstream O2 Sensor target voltage from nominal target voltage. The value of the downstream fuel trim is compared with the lean thresholds. Every time the value exceeds the calibrated threshold, a fail timer will increment and mass flow through the exhaust is accumulated. If the fail timer and accumulated mass flow exceed the fail thresholds, the test fails and the diagnostic stops running for that trip.


Default Actions:

•MIL light will illuminate.


Possible Causes

EXHAUST LEAK
FUEL DELIVERY SYSTEM
O2 SENSOR, WIRING, OR CONNECTORS
ENGINE MECHANICAL SYSTEM
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)




U0415-00-IMPLAUSIBLE DATA RECEIVED FROM ABS

Perform the COMMUNICATION PRE-DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURE. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).





28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Body Control (BCM) / Standard Procedure

COMMUNICATION PRE-DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURE

Communication Pre-Diagnostic Procedure


1.CHECK FOR POSSIBLE CAUSES

NOTE: For an in-depth explanation of the CAN system operation, refer to the DESCRIPTION in Section 8E, COMMUNICATION.

1. Check Battery for proper State of Charge (SOC) and Charging System for proper operation. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/Charging/Diagnosis and Testing) .

2. With a scan tool, check all electronic Control Modules for battery and ignition voltage related DTCs.

3. Check for and perform all Service Bulletins that could be related to the customer complaint.

4. Check aftermarket accessories for proper installation. (Check for improper electrical connections and fasteners that may be contacting wire harnesses.)

5. With a scan tool, check all electronic Control Modules for software updates that are related to the customer complaint. Update Control Module(s) as necessary.

6. Check wire harnesses for collision related damage.

Were any problems found?

Yes

•Repair the problem as necessary.
•With a scan tool, erase DTCs from the related electronic Control Modules and perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 2



2.CHECK ELECTRONIC CONTROL MODULES FOR VEHICLE CONFIGURATION DTCS

NOTE:
A Configuration DTC indicates that an Electronic Control Module (ECU) is not programmed with information that is specific to the vehicle (VIN, mileage, etc.). If an ECU is not configured properly, serial data communication failures could exist. The following list includes, but is not limited to, DTC descriptors that indicate a Configuration DTC.

•ECU Configuration Mismatch - Not Configured
•ECU Unable To Configure
•Implausible/Missing ECU Network Configuration Data
•Implausible/Missing Vehicle Configuration Data
•Implausible Vehicle Configuration
•Incorrect Variant/Configuration
•PROXI Not Programmed
•Restore Vehicle Configuration
•Vehicle Configuration Mismatch
•Vehicle Configuration Not Programmed

1. With the scan tool, generate a Vehicle Scan Report.

2. With the Vehicle Scan Report, check all ECUs for Configuration DTCs.

Are any Configuration DTCs set?

Yes

•Configure the ECU(s) as necessary in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that electronic Control Module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 3



3.CHECK ELECTRONIC CONTROL MODULES FOR ACTIVE COMMUNICATION RELATED DTCS

1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

Are any Communication related DTCs active?

Yes

•Go To 4

No

•Go To 5



4.CHECK ACTIVE DTCS

1.
Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

NOTE: Diagnose Lost Communication DTCs (not to be confused with CAN Bus Off or Can Bus Performance DTCs) before diagnosing other CAN related DTCs.

Which type of Communication DTC is active?

Lost Communication

•Go To 7

Implausible Data, Implausible Signal, Missing Message, or Invalid Data

•Go To 9



5.CHECK STORED DTCS

1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

NOTE: Diagnose all Lost Communication DTCs before diagnosing other CAN related DTCs.

Which type of Communication DTC is stored?

Lost Communication

•Perform the STORED LOST COMMUNICATION DTCS procedure. (Refer to 29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics/Communication/Diagnosis and Testing) .

Implausible Data, Implausible Signal, Missing Message, or Invalid Data

•Go To 6



6.CHECK OFFENDING CONTROL MODULE FOR DTCS

NOTE: The ‘Offending Control Module’ is the module that the Implausible DTC is set against.

1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

Are any DTCs set in the Offending Control Module?

Yes

•Refer to the appropriate diagnostic procedure.

No

•Go To 11



7.CHECK FOR MULTIPLE LOST COMMUNICATION DTCS


1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

Choose the scenario that best describes the condition of the vehicle from the list below:

One module is reporting a Lost Communication DTC against a single Control Module.

•Go To 8

Multiple Control Modules are reporting a Lost Communication DTC against a single Control Module.

•Perform the NO RESPONSE diagnostic procedure for the Control Module that is not communicating. (Refer to 29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics/Communication/Diagnosis and Testing) .



8.CHECK OFFENDING CONTROL MODULE FOR COMMUNICATION

NOTE: The ‘Offending Control Module’ is the module that the Loss of Communication DTC is set against.

1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

Is the Offending Control Module active on the bus?

Yes

•Replace the Reporting Control Module in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that Control Module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).

No

•Perform the NO RESPONSE diagnostic procedure for the module that is not communicating. (Refer to 29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics/Communication/Diagnosis and Testing) .



9.CHECK OFFENDING CONTROL MODULE FOR DTCS

NOTE: The ‘Offending Control Module’ is the module that the Implausible Data, Implausible Signal, Missing Message, or Invalid Data DTC is set against.

1. Refer to the Vehicle Scan Report.

With the scan tool, check the Offending Control Module for non-U-code DTCs that are related to the U-code that is set, or related to the customer complaint if the U-code DTC name is not clear about which signal is faulted.

Yes

•Refer to the appropriate diagnostic procedure.

No

•Go To 10



10.CHECK OTHER CONTROL MODULES FOR RELATED NON U-CODE DTCS

NOTE: IMPORTANT: Some Control Modules simply pass information from one Control Module to the other. In some cases, a U-code DTC may be set that implicates the “pass-through” module that sent the information. For example, if an Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor DTC is set in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM), the HVAC module may set an “Implausible Data from BCM” DTC because the BCM is the module that normally passes that information from the PCM to the HVAC module. However, the BCM may not set any DTCs related to the faulted ECT Sensor because the BCM does not use the ECT information. In this case, the PCM ECT DTC should be diagnosed before the Implausible Data DTC. If you suspect a scenario like this, diagnose the non U-code DTC(s) before diagnosing any Implausible Data, Implausible Signal, Invalid Data, or Missing Message DTCs.

1. With the scan tool, check all other Control Modules for non-U-code DTCs that are related to the U-code that is set, or related to the customer complaint if the U-code DTC name is not clear about which signal is faulted.

Is a related non U-code DTC set in another Control Module?

Yes

•Diagnose the related DTC. Refer to the appropriate Diagnostic Procedure.

No

•Replace the Offending Control Module in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).



11.CHECK RELATED WIRE HARNESS CONNECTIONS

1. Disconnect all related wire harness connectors.

2. Disconnect all related in-line wire harness connections (if equipped).

3. Inspect wire harness connectors, component connectors, and all male and female terminals for the following conditions:
•Proper connector installation.
•Damaged connector locks.
•Corrosion.
•Signs of water intrusion.
•Weather seal damage (if equipped).
•Bent terminals.
•Overheating due to a poor connection (terminal may be discolored due to excessive current draw).
•Terminals that have been pushed back into the connector cavity.
•Perform a terminal drag test on each connector terminal to verify proper terminal tension.

Repair any conditions that are found.

4. Reconnect all related wire harness connectors. Be certain that all wire harness connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

5. Reconnect all in-line wire harness connectors (if equipped). Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

6. With the scan tool, erase DTCs.

7. Using the Vehicle Scan Report, operate the vehicle in the conditions that set the DTC.

8. With the scan tool, read DTCs.

Did the DTC return?

Yes

•If there is a history of this DTC setting multiple times, replace the Offending Control Module in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that Control Module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).

No

•Perform the appropriate VERIFICATION TEST. If a VERIFICATION TEST is not available for that Control Module, perform the BCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) /Standard Procedure).
•Test complete.
 

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I would think a powertrain warranty should cover this. U0415 is more of a Network failure code not necessarily an ABS problem. Almost everything depends on a good CAN Bus network.
Is the engine running right or does it seem different?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well when I turn it over to start it sounds and acts completely different. Sometimes it doesn't even fire but when it does it takes quite a few rounds to fire. Very extended startup compared to before when it would just fire up immediately. When it does fire though it sounds pretty normal to me. I am an electrician so I can probably do some of electrical testing after work and see if I can find anything of interest. I have a little under 107,000 miles and I can visibly see where oil has been leaking. Fresh and wet and its on some electrical connections on the right (driver side) of the engine bay area. So I was thinking I will clean up there aswell.
 

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Oil can mess up a connector. Oil leaks on the driver side can be from a bad oil separator o-ring or from the vacuum pump.


125237



125238
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well ended up getting it towed to the dealership. Waiting on a callback to see what they say is going on with it. Check and cleaned up oil covered connectors aswell as checked all fuses and everything seemed fine there. Will update on what they find thanks for the responses! I have only the dart since July and been doing a lot of reading after getting worries me a bit. I love the car but worried about dependability at this point. Only 106k miles on it now I've had older vehicles with way more mileage that have never left me sitting on the side of the road!
 

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Well ended up getting it towed to the dealership. Waiting on a callback to see what they say is going on with it. Check and cleaned up oil covered connectors aswell as checked all fuses and everything seemed fine there. Will update on what they find thanks for the responses! I have only the dart since July and been doing a lot of reading after getting worries me a bit. I love the car but worried about dependability at this point. Only 106k miles on it now I've had older vehicles with way more mileage that have never left me sitting on the side of the road!
Definitely let us know. It also depends on what your old vehicles were. Sure you can pick up an old honda or toyota with 100k+ and it will probably still run strong maybe. However, it's also based on how the owner/owners drove it before you. Some of them might have driven it hard, did not maintain it at the correct intervals, did not care for it. You can never blame an old car's dependability when you have only owned it such a short time.

The car is a great looking car, but there can be some issues. First you have the turbo, which requires more frequent maintenance, and has some parts that are known for failure. Second you have the DDCT automatic, which actually had a recall for the TCM and people haven't really liked it in general. Some maintenance, like more expensive oil, more frequent oil changes if the turbo is burning any oil (which can be normal), spark plugs every 30k miles (not the 100k in the NA engines of the dart), preferred premium octane gas, timing belt change at 150k ($$$), probably a transmission flush which they say is due every 50k now. While none of these things are probably related to your issue, it's good to know once you resolve this issue so you can stay on top of them and not run into bigger and more issues down the road. This seems like a lot of maintenance, but this is normal for just about any newer car especially approaching and above the 100k mark. That's when the more expensive stuff comes in, and when parts naturally give out and need replaced. It doesn't matter if you own a Dodge, Ford, Honda, Toyota, Chevy. You're still going to need the basic maintenance and replacement of parts further into it's life. And when you haven't owned the car all it's life, those parts might go bad early due to neglect.

I have gone 82k on my GT with very little work needing done. My rear parking brake caliper froze on me (the actual parking brake part) and that stopped me from driving it and needed a replacement because mine is manual so I always use the parking brake. I was able to release it and just leave it in gear after finding the issue, but I don't like doing that. A lot of people do. lol My friend had a Chevy Sonic and made it to 100k before things started needing replaced - wheel bearing, coolant hose, etc . He did basic maintenance but other than that just drove the thing. I've also had friends with Hondas that had to put work into it way before me and my Chevy friend. Dependability is really hard to count on from anything, especially used. I hope the dealer can figure this out and it's not a huge bill. From there, just keep up with the research, see what needs to be done and plan for it. Maybe do a tune up if you haven't already like spark plugs, rear brakes and rotors (fronts last a good while but worth to check), transmission fluid change. Other things to maybe check for is control arms (ball joints are part of them so the entire arm needs replaced), struts, coolant system, and maybe calipers. Good luck and we hope you fix your issue!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
They are saying it's the crank position sensor and want $800 to fix it. I'm not convinced or impressed. I've had CPS ho out before in different vehicles and the cars wouldn't start at all but my dodge dart still starts! What do you guys think? Now I'm out 150 for diagnostics and I gott get car towed again
 

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They are saying it's the crank position sensor and want $800 to fix it. I'm not convinced or impressed. I've had CPS ho out before in different vehicles and the cars wouldn't start at all but my dodge dart still starts! What do you guys think? Now I'm out 150 for diagnostics and I gott get car towed again
I mean that is one of the codes, but that does not make sense as to why it is throwing all the other codes, ABS, Oxygen sensor, cat errors. A CPS shouldn't be the cause of everything (I would think). If they gave a good reason on why it's causing all the other issues, it might be believable. Maybe since the crank is not detected properly, it errors out other engine codes. But ABS, should absolutely not be related, which gives me the impression that it is something else. Unless that error was present before.

Alpine might be able to give the replacement details on the crank position sensor. The part itself is like $20.https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/dodge,2013,dart,1.4l+l4+turbocharged,1504427,ignition,crankshaft+position+sensor,7196

Not sure the difficulty in replacement, I found some videos but they are the NA engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm going to get car today and I am looking into changing it myself this afternoon. I am going to unplug the current sensor and see if behavior changes. If there is a change I would think that is definitely NOT the issue right? I have trust issues big time when it comes to mechanics and I fear they did nothing more than hookup obd2 scanner and that's it. I would've had them go ahead and fix it but my warranty of course doesn't cover the repair.
 

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I'm going to get car today and I am looking into changing it myself this afternoon. I am going to unplug the current sensor and see if behavior changes. If there is a change I would think that is definitely NOT the issue right? I have trust issues big time when it comes to mechanics and I fear they did nothing more than hookup obd2 scanner and that's it. I would've had them go ahead and fix it but my warranty of course doesn't cover the repair.
yeah I don't blame you. I wouldn't go forward with that repair either. Especially since there are so many other errors. I have had bad lucks with shops and dealers too so I feel you on that. Especially with these new cars, a lot of people have no idea what needs done on their car because everything is computer controlled. It looked like the front sensor on the 2.0 is simple, I found another post from Alpine showing the rear on the 2.0 and it's not as fun. But since the 1.4 is completely different, I wasn't able to find anything, or videos. All videos I found were for 2.0 or 2.4 and any results from the crankshaft position sensor error, gives me little results. It seemed like the NA engines had two sensors, one on each side of the engine, so you might be looking for 2.

The NA engines had them near cylinder 4 on the right most side of the engine, so it's possible it's similar, but the 2.0/2.4 engines are Chrysler made, and the 1.4t is Fiat. However the 2.4 does have the multiair which takes place one of the cams and the 2.0 is a standard dual overhead cam. Not sure if there was a difference in position.
 

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If I remember correctly the 2013 has a different location for the CkPS. This is from a 2016 FSM.
14 - Fuel System / Fuel Injection, Gas / SENSOR, Crankshaft Position / Description

1.4L

The Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor (1) is mounted into the rear crankshaft oil seal retainer. It is positioned to read the tone wheel (2) mounted on the rear of the crankshaft. The sensor is accessed from behind the catalytic converter and is located at the transmission and cylinder block interface.

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14 - Fuel System / Fuel Injection, Gas / SENSOR, Crankshaft Position / Removal

1.4L

1.Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.

2.Raise and support the vehicle (Refer to 04 - Vehicle Quick Reference/Hoisting/Standard Procedure) .

3.Remove the catalytic converter (Refer to 11 - Exhaust System/CONVERTER, Catalytic/Removal) .

4.Unlock and disconnect the crankshaft position sensor harness connector at the vacuum pump bracket.

5.Remove the nut (1) and bolt (2) from the crankshaft position sensor heat shield (3). Remove the heat shield (3) from the engine.

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NOTE: Transmission and bell housing not shown

6.Using a 5 mm hex wrench (3), loosen the crankshaft position sensor mounting screw (1) just enough to remove the Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP) from the alignment boss (2).

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NOTE: Do not over loosen the screw. The screw has a captured washer and both the screw and the washer CAN BE dropped into the bell housing if the screw is removed.

7.Remove the sensor (1) from the alignment boss (2).


14 - Fuel System / Fuel Injection, Gas / SENSOR, Crankshaft Position / Installation

1.4L

NOTE: Transmission and bell housing not shown

1.Install the crankshaft position sensor (1) with mounting screw.

CAUTION:
Make sure the CKP sensor is firmly seated against the alignment boss prior to rotating the fastener. The sensor will be damaged if the fastener is used to align or draw the sensor into position.

2.Tighten the mounting screw to 4 N·m (35 in. lbs.).

3.Install the sensor shield (3).

4.Install the nut (1) and bolt (2). Tighten to 9 N·m, 80 in. lbs.).

5.Connect and lock the CKP harness connector.

6.Install the catalytic converter (Refer to 11 - Exhaust System/CONVERTER, Catalytic/Installation) .

7.Connect the battery negative cable and tighten nut to 5 N·m (45 in. lbs.).
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well I replaced the part myself today. Cost me $145 for crankshaft position sensor and low and behold it did not fix it. Everything is still the same. Low compression sounding and long drawn out fire time, rpm guage jumps up past 7000rpms(engine idling fine) and traction control and check engine lights on. Gonna do another obd 2 scan tonight but I doubt its gonna help at this point so now I'm out $135 for dealers worthless diagnostic and $145 for a part I didnt need
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I guess it should also be noted that under obd 2 live data stream it IS reporting the correct RPMs so that would tell me the crankshaft position sensor is operating accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I did test the crankshaft sensor connector and I get two outside pins 5volts dc and the middle pin has continuity with ground. Anyone know if that's correct? I don't really know where to go from here. I changed the sensor didnt help and if I unplug it the car acts exactly the same and no new codes are give just the same original 4 codes.
 
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