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Hey guys,

I'm nearing another oil change soon. Do you guys replace the gasket that goes around the oil pain drain plug? If so, where do you get them from?

The engine is a 2.4L.
 

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After looking up the PN from @Bullfrog, it does make sense that they'd just sell a fully new plug and not a gasket. Though it is more expensive for us as an end user, but that's how the automotive world works these days. At least this isn't the type of gasket that should be changed with every oil change like a crush washer. So you can keep using your drain plug until it no longer performs it's duty of keeping the oil in.
 

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I reuse mine until failure. it'll be noticeable at next change with the oil dust collection around drain hole. It will not leak badly! just wicking.
 

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The original drain plug uses a permanent gasket that's molded in. Your local auto parts store sells all sorts of different types that will fit including ones with a replaceable gasket. I replaced mine when the hex head started to get rounded off, and I found a new one at the auto parts store that had a larger head on it.
 

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Does anyone know the torque on the oil drain plug bolt? I can't find it in the service manuals.
30 ft/lbs per the torque specs here:
To be honest, in all my years of changing my own oil I've never took a torque wrench to my filter or my drain plug. No leaking, no seepage, no issues. You don't want to over torque it anyway as you'll end up doing more damage with an over torque. In this case when it's "tight it's tight and you'll be alright" is the best approach.
 

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30 ft/lbs per the torque specs here:
To be honest, in all my years of changing my own oil I've never took a torque wrench to my filter or my drain plug. No leaking, no seepage, no issues. You don't want to over torque it anyway as you'll end up doing more damage with an over torque. In this case when it's "tight it's tight and you'll be alright" is the best approach.
same here!
 

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I have a 2.4l, and I found another spec that called for 20 ft*lbs.
Specs don't change just because it's a 2.4 or a 2.0 as they utilize the same oil pan and plug. The specs pulled from above are straight from the OE spec manual from FCA. The only thing that is different between the 2.0 and 2.4 is the head. Nothing more, nothing less. Either way, you'll be fine as long as it's tight and not over-tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Specs don't change just because it's a 2.4 or a 2.0 as they utilize the same oil pan and plug. The specs pulled from above are straight from the OE spec manual from FCA. The only thing that is different between the 2.0 and 2.4 is the head. Nothing more, nothing less. Either way, you'll be fine as long as it's tight and not over-tight.
Well the head and the bore or stroke too?

But ok, thank you! I didn't know they share the same oil pan and plug.
 

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Well the head and the bore or stroke too?
Yes, if you want to get technical about it, the head, the bore and the stroke. The general gist (and for the sake of simplicity) within the internal workings of the engine the only major significant change is the Multi-air head vs the DOHC.
 

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I always tighten my oil pan drain plugs with an ordinary box-end wrench. That way I don't round off the head and it gives just the right leverage to tighten it snug without over-tightening. Fortunately the Dart has a steel oil pan, but my old Neon has an aluminum one and the drain plug hole was stripped when I first bought the car, requiring me to get a new oil pan.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I always tighten my oil pan drain plugs with an ordinary box-end wrench. That way I don't round off the head and it gives just the right leverage to tighten it snug without over-tightening. Fortunately the Dart has a steel oil pan, but my old Neon has an aluminum one and the drain plug hole was stripped when I first bought the car, requiring me to get a new oil pan.
I was surprised that the dart's pan is steel. I guess it's just do to ease of manufacturing.
 

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I always tighten my oil pan drain plugs with an ordinary box-end wrench. That way I don't round off the head and it gives just the right leverage to tighten it snug without over-tightening. Fortunately the Dart has a steel oil pan, but my old Neon has an aluminum one and the drain plug hole was stripped when I first bought the car, requiring me to get a new oil pan.
Actually any aluminum thread is fairly easily and reliably repaired with a Timesert thread insert. You did not need to buy a new oil pan. If you did some research, you would have found a thread on neons.org. I have the Timesert kit and would have sent it to you with the right size insert.
 
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