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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Audio installations in the Dart are now common place and I believe everyone is getting the feel for it. Tap your speakers with an inline high output converter and install your favorite components.

The only aspect of the Dart’s native audio system that I deplore is what appears to be a built in Automatic Gain Control (AGC) which attenuates frequencies to prevent distortion and cannot be disabled to my knowledge. It’s very obvious on certain tracks and is rather annoying.

Regardless, I wanted to share my installation of a subwoofer in my Dart. I did not want to complicate the installation by choosing a subwoofer that fit within the rear deck opening. I’ve spent years installing car audio and I wanted to keep it simple. By complicate I mean: speaker selection, amplifier selection, sound dampening, rattling and any other aspect of component selection that could be encountered.

Instead I chose the following equipment:

-----------------------

* Rockford Fosgate Punch P300-12 Single 12" Powered Subwoofer Enclosure

-Specifications-
Woofer Size: 12"
System Configuration: Sealed
Power Handling: 300 Watts RMS
Frequency Response: 35Hz to 150Hz
Integrated Amplifier: 300 Watts RMS
Crossover Controls: Variable 50Hz to 200Hz @ 12dB/Octave Butterworth
Tone Controls: Gain & Bass Boost

-Signal Input-
Low-Level: 1 RCA Pair
High-Level: Left/Right Summed Inputs
Power Input Connector: Removable Connector Power/Ground/Remote
Power Wire Gauge: 8 AWG
Heat Sink Type: Extruded Aluminum
Cooling: Convection
Remote Control: Included
Visual Indicators: Power, Protection
Circuit Topology Class: Class-D

-Dimensions-
15 x 19.8 x D1 11 - D2 7 (in)
38.1 x 50.29 x D1 27.94 - D2 17.78 (cm)



* Scosche EFX Delta D Block

-Specifications-
Power and Ground Distribution/Combination Block
Max Input Gauge Size: 4 AWG
Max Output Gauge Size: 1/0 AWG
Fuse Type: Mini AFS


* StreetWires FSAFS40 - 40 Amp AFS Fuses
* StreetWires ZN1K-04 - 4 Gauge Amp Install Kit
* Hitron SPW-16100 - 100 ft. of OFC 16 Gauge Speaker Wire
* 5 ft. Red and Black 4 Gauge Power Wire


-----------------------


I started my installation by reading many of the reviews and experiences of fellow Dart owners. This gave me plenty of insight to possible issues and roadblocks. I also made heavy use of Chrysler’s online wiring site to determine exactly which wires I would need to tap in order to achieve my objectives.

Objectives

  1. Locate passage through firewall
  2. Tap wiring at front door speakers and run leads to trunk
  3. Install amplifier wiring harness and turn-on signal wire from battery to trunk
  4. Run additional wires to front door speakers for future replacements
  5. Run bass boost remote control to front dashboard
  6. Install power/ground distribution block in trunk





The primary area of work is going to be as pictured above. On the 2.0L Tigershark Engine model there is a decent predrilled passage through the firewall that is about 1.5”-2” in diameter with a grommet directly behind the brake pedal.

It is difficult to retrieve this grommet without losing it due to way that it is installed. I tried my best but ultimately it fell down into the engine compartment which is as you know sealed at the bottom. With a bit of ingenuity consisting of a broomstick and a vacuum (don’t ask) I was able to retrieve the factory grommet from the base pan below the engine and I did so just for the sake of it not being permanently lost down there; I used my own grommet that was actually about 6” long and tapered. You cut off the smallest portion that would allow the wires to pass through and zip tie the end. Nice!

In this instance I am working with a 4ga power main and an 18ga amplifier turn-on signal wire both secured inside split loom.

Also in the picture above is the primary wiring channel hidden beneath the hard plastic paneling where you see the factory protective clear plastic protector used to avoid scratches on the rocker panel.




Once the paneling is removed the wiring harness and channel are exposed. I started working here so that I understood the spaces and confines with which I had to work with and allowed me to understand how I would run my power main, speaker, signal wires etc.






Exposed above you can see the main speaker wires for the L/F Door Speaker. They are actually easy to locate if you use Chrysler’s wiring site coupled with the fact that speaker wires are typically twisted. The other twisted pair is for the dash speaker. I will be duplicating my work on the passenger side as well.

The connection used to connect the wiring to the door is amazing and well though out. In older vehicles wiring typically ran straight through the pillar inside a rubber grommet and into the door which made servicing difficult and caused issues with wire chaffing etc. On late model vehicles they’ve opted to make the door Plug N’ Play which is brilliant. You can essentially remove the entire Dart door within minutes as there are two main bolts and a waterproof harness connector which plugs into the pillar. Nice again!

The wires in the image above; the upper leads run to the head unit and the lower leads run to the pillar connection. Instead of just tapping the wires I cut them and then teed them with the speaker wire running back to the trunk. This is the line I will use to obtain audio from the head unit. I also ran a spare speaker line from the same location to the trunk; it is not connected to anything and simply remains in the channel for future use.

This will allow me to replace the stock door speakers in the future and power them with my own amplifier. In which case I would connect the spare speaker line to the lower leads going to the pillar connector/door and the upper leads would stay connected to the main speaker wire going to the trunk.

This will allow me to feed the high output lead from the head unit to multiple components.

I chose the Rockford Fosgate Punch P300-12 Single 12" Powered Subwoofer Enclosure






For the sake of simplicity, this is a well designed, decent sized, powered sub that will be more than adequate for my needs.

Some of the advantages here are that it automatically turns on based on your choice of signal from a 12v source, or audio signal over the speaker line which can be set to work with high input levels.

In essence Rocford Fosgate gives you an all inclusive package to get up and running with minimal investment in multiple products such as an independent high output line converter and no need for a 12v signal line.

But you may be saying to yourself, “Zep you mentioned running a 12v amplifier turn-on lead!” And you’d be correct. Much like the additional speaker line for the front door speakers I also planned for the future.




I love this car!

In the engine compartment you will find your 12v automotive battery. On the battery is a black plastic cover with a red cap over it. The red cap conceals the 12v jump start post in case you need to jump start your vehicle. The black plastic cover (at least on my Limited) contains a spare round opening. How fortuitous to me!




Underneath the black plastic cover is an array of fuses on an odd shaped platform connected to the positive battery post. These fuses serve a couple of different purposes of which exceed the scope of this tutorial.

On this platform I found a spare post that had no connection or nut secured on it. I had a spare lock-nut in my collection of spare parts which met the exact form, fit, and function. This is where I connected my amplifier cable.




The cable itself runs from the battery, down, and up into the fuse box. This is where I placed the inline fuse holder for the amplifier which was included in the StreetWires ZN1K-04 amplifier wiring kit. You always want the inline fuse holder close to the battery. This is close enough and the fuse box offers protection from external elements.

You can also see a blue wire labeled as AMP POWER/SWITCHING. This wire is not connected to anything at this point. This will be used with any possible future amplifiers that lack the automatic audio detection of Rockford’s powered subwoofer. It would be connected to one of the fuses in the fuse box which become energized when the ignition is switched on. In the meantime it will remain coiled and disconnected.

From the fuse box the red 12v / 4ga main power line and blue wire signal wire run out of the backside of the fuse box, down the firewall and through the grommet into the cabin. The cables then run under the dash towards the pillar and along the rocker panel wiring channel all the way to the trunk.

Along with the power and signal lines I've also run my two speaker wires (high level and spare return wire) which are kept separate from the power and 12v signal wire. In addition I also ran the cable for the remote bass boost controller. This is basically a 20 foot long 3.5mm stereo cable.




In this picture I have the Scosche EFX Delta D Block. This is a really well made power and ground distribution block that allows you to distribute to multiple components. I chose this block so that I can add a separate 4 channel amplifier for the door speakers in the future. In the meantime it will distribute power to the Rockford powered enclosure. I installed two 40 AMP fuses in the block. Between the block and the battery there are two points of protection.

I ground down the paint on the interior of the trunk where the ground cable connects and secured it using a self tapping screw. You always want to keep your ground connection as short as possible. In this application I left the ground cable about 1 foot long. The distribution block is secured to the rear deck angle using self tapping screws. Both the power and ground cables enter on the left side of the distribution block.




The high level audio leads coming from the L/F and R/F doors were soldered to pigtails on a clean set of female RCA connectors. Heat shrink was used to finish the soldering work. I did this because the speaker input connector for the Rockford subwoofer came with male RCA connectors. I didn’t want to cut this adapter so I did the next best thing.




The main power connection for the sealed enclosure is a solid block that your cables secure directly into. The unused connection in the middle is to secure the blue 12v signal switching line if it’s used.




In this picture you can see the sealed enclosures power cable, the high input speaker connector and the 3.5mm bass boost connector that goes to the controller mounted on the dash board.




Here is a complete view of all the wiring in the trunk. Secured behind the carpet over the left rear wheel well is about 5 feet of the blue 12v switching cable, and the future speaker wires for the L/F and R/F doors. Whenever I upgrade the door speakers I will also upgrade the rear doors as well. I will have to run additional wiring to them as I have for the fronts.




This is what I consider a clean install. In this picture the sub is lying down. It produces much more punch and is aesthetically pleasing. It doesn't take much trunk space at all.




Removal of the subwoofer takes only a couple of seconds.






Above are a couple of shots with the remote bass level controller. Or as Rockford calls it “Punch Level Controller”. It’s nice to be able to adjust the bass with a single potentiometer rather than navigating a head unit.




Above is a close up of the subwoofers controls and connections.


I hope this helps someone either in the installation of their own system or at least gives someone an idea of what can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice write up... How does that powered sub enclosure compare sound wise to a traditional sub and amp setup?
Excellent question and that answer is rather subjective so it's hard to quantify. I'm more old school in that I like the sound of a traditional woofer over a subwoofer which I find can be overbearing; that often times obnoxious woom, woom, woom you can encounter at traffic lights. I'm like rock/alternative more than anything and woofers better reproduce this genre than subwoofers.

I used to have this -> MTX TW122 Road Thunder Dual 12" Full-Range Wedg 267-076

Connected to a 200 watt rms amp, kicked serious ass despite its low price tag.

Now, to give you my opinion on the powered enclosure... I'm definitely enjoying it especially due to the fact that I can fine tune it on the fly. It's not a giant box and thus not overpowering and it does surprisingly well. The bass is delightfully perfect inside the car without being a public nuisance outside. Top 40, rock, golden oldies all sound better than I thought they would.

The only remaining shortcoming is the stock door speakers. They really lack fidelity.
 

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Could you elaborate some more details on this. I am working on wiring a line converter. I was originally going to go from the main radio harness but I have a Limited with the 6-speaker and am having difficulty finding the correct harness under the dash. On the door sills, did you cut open the wire-wrap to find the speaker wire? I may just tap into them on each side and run 3 feet of wire to a central area under the dash and hide the converter box there.

On the flip side, I did do the battery positive setup and it works stupendously, like it was meant to be. Also for the trunk ground, if you pull up that tucked-carpet spot immediately behind the rear seats in the trunk, you find a two-bolt and nut setup for a bracket, I just grounded it there.

Still working out a switch, it will probably be a hidden keyed power switch on/off. No idea where I am going to pull the measly power from though.

And I couldn't agree more with the door speakers. I will probably convert the front doors to 6 1/2" and leave the rears 6x9, and add-in the deck lid 6x9's. The car lacks high's pretty bad too, its like they tried to shoot them down a hallway when positioning them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Could you elaborate some more details on this. I am working on wiring a line converter. I was originally going to go from the main radio harness but I have a Limited with the 6-speaker and am having difficulty finding the correct harness under the dash. On the door sills, did you cut open the wire-wrap to find the speaker wire? I may just tap into them on each side and run 3 feet of wire to a central area under the dash and hide the converter box there.
Yes, once you remove the kick panel at the door jam you will see a harness. Gently cut the black wrapping and it will reveal the wires as shown in the 2nd and 3rd pic from the top.

On the flip side, I did do the battery positive setup and it works stupendously, like it was meant to be.
This was exactly my thought.

Still working out a switch, it will probably be a hidden keyed power switch on/off. No idea where I am going to pull the measly power from though.
That fuse box under the hood has a keyed 12v source which is why I ran a spare line into it. Not sure which fuse. Someone else covered it in another audio thread.

And I couldn't agree more with the door speakers. I will probably convert the front doors to 6 1/2" and leave the rears 6x9, and add-in the deck lid 6x9's. The car lacks high's pretty bad too, its like they tried to shoot them down a hallway when positioning them.
No doubt that the stock 6 speaker system leaves allot to be desired. I just wish the damn head unit didn't use AGC. It would be nice to find a device or amp that would compensate for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So when you tap into the door speakers, must you do both the left and right sides?
Yes, that is correct. Once you do the driver side, the passenger side becomes easy. I do it this way because I prefer not to take the dashboard apart. This car has 36 computer modules in it. You DO NOT want to piss it off.
 

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Yep, driver's side was the first 35 minutes, passenger side took 15. Plumbed the wires into the center part of the dash and pulled the panel aside on the drivers half. There is a spot to stash the converter there and wire it in. Then I proceeded to run the RCA wires through the floorboard in loom at the bend in it, and over to the driver's side door sill, and ran the remote/RCA's back on that side, ran the +12 main down the passenger side.

However, I am still working on a keyed +12v for my remote wire. I am not sure where is the easiest location to tap from, I'm trying to avoid running another wire through the firewall so under the hood is out of the question. The center console cigarette lighter is EASY to get too, but it is a constant. My wife drives this car sometimes and I would rather just have a keyed +12v with a switch on it, so that I can shut the amp off if I shut the radio off.

Any idea's on an easy-to-tap-into +12v keyed source?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yep, driver's side was the first 35 minutes, passenger side took 15. Plumbed the wires into the center part of the dash and pulled the panel aside on the drivers half. There is a spot to stash the converter there and wire it in. Then I proceeded to run the RCA wires through the floorboard in loom at the bend in it, and over to the driver's side door sill, and ran the remote/RCA's back on that side, ran the +12 main down the passenger side.

However, I am still working on a keyed +12v for my remote wire. I am not sure where is the easiest location to tap from, I'm trying to avoid running another wire through the firewall so under the hood is out of the question. The center console cigarette lighter is EASY to get too, but it is a constant. My wife drives this car sometimes and I would rather just have a keyed +12v with a switch on it, so that I can shut the amp off if I shut the radio off.

Any idea's on an easy-to-tap-into +12v keyed source?
none. I never even looked into any other options because of the complexity of electronics in this car so I just stuck with the fuse panel at the battery. There's another fuse panel under the dash as far as I can tell. I would try there but definitely look for the owners manual or follow the legend and test each fuse for keyed power.
 

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none. I never even looked into any other options because of the complexity of electronics in this car so I just stuck with the fuse panel at the battery. There's another fuse panel under the dash as far as I can tell. I would try there but definitely look for the owners manual or follow the legend and test each fuse for keyed power.
Like F3. Interior fuse box.
 

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Alright where the F is the interior fuse block. There is just wayyyy too much wiring stuffed in specific locations. Don't get me wrong I love electronics and wiring but damn.
 

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Okay, thanks for this guide, it is GREAT and detailed (great photos), but would you be able to further explain how you split the speaker signal and sent it to the trunk?

I understand the concept, but like you need wire from L and R speakers?? and how did you wire them to the sub/amp ( I plan on buying a RF P300-12 ) and what specific parts did u use to do it?

I have a 13 Dart SXT (without 8.4" touchscreen or alpine system, just the 4x 6x9's and two dash tweeters)

Thanks again!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You will need to reference the wiring schematic for your car. I cannot recall which wires are positive or negative nor can I remember the color of the passenger side wires. You will need to get the wiring for your car from here.

You’ll need your VIN to help:

https://techauthorityonlinedemo.extra.chrysler.com/service/repair/wiring/view/classic.htm

In my installation you can see in the third picture from the top, I spliced into the wiring for the driver’s door wires which are the violet w/purple stripe and the gray w/yellow stripe. I also did the same for the passengers door which has different colors.

You can use a tap connector:

https://www.google.com/search?q=wire+tap+connector&oq=wire+tap+connector&aqs=chrome.0.69i57j0l3j69i62.2559j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

I then ran the wires through the wiring channels along the interior of the car to the trunk and connected them to female RCA pigtails. Those will plug right into the P300-12.

Go through your procedure step-by-step before you begin. Note all the wire colors and lay it out like a map. It helps once you get underway.
 

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Okay, thanks for this guide, it is GREAT and detailed (great photos), but would you be able to further explain how you split the speaker signal and sent it to the trunk?

I understand the concept, but like you need wire from L and R speakers?? and how did you wire them to the sub/amp ( I plan on buying a RF P300-12 ) and what specific parts did u use to do it?

I have a 13 Dart SXT (without 8.4" touchscreen or alpine system, just the 4x 6x9's and two dash tweeters)

Thanks again!!
I have a very similar question/situation to this. Was attempting to install a sub and amp this morning and got to connecting the audio. Do I go to the back of the deck or the rear speakers? I pulled the dash off and unscrewed the deck but it would only pull out about an inch as it was secured by a really short connection at the back of the deck which I could not reach. Just need some advice. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have a very similar question/situation to this. Was attempting to install a sub and amp this morning and got to connecting the audio. Do I go to the back of the deck or the rear speakers? I pulled the dash off and unscrewed the deck but it would only pull out about an inch as it was secured by a really short connection at the back of the deck which I could not reach. Just need some advice. Thanks in advance.
When it comes down to it, it's truly up to you. For me, I did not want to go pulling ANYTHING apart in my brand new car. I went for the front speakers as I have read from others in this forum that they are driven with a little more oompf from the head unit (deck). I have not validated this but I just tapped the lines as shown in my tutorial. Going for the head unit adds more complication and risk than needed.

Good luck!
 

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Re; a couple questions if your free..?? thanx, Nude_Art

Hey there... great write up.... yellow and purple are the speaker feeds ??? which is negative..?? the yellow??? also is it the same on the passenger side.?? was going to remove the door panels but you'r method is way easier ...!! glad I found it..!! weather tech trunk mat or factory...?? is nice... also How do you get the fuse cover off??? for my remote tap..?? don't want to break it..!! thanks for your help.. Have a 500 watt Alpine amp and 12" Pioneer Sub...all wiring Stinger..love the noise...!! ( also 6*9 Pioneer 140 watt for the doors sitting on my floor doing noth' !!!) Nude_Art

Audio installations in the Dart are now common place and I believe everyone is getting the feel for it. Tap your speakers with an inline high output converter and install your favorite components.

The only aspect of the Dart’s native audio system that I deplore is what appears to be a built in Automatic Gain Control (AGC) which attenuates frequencies to prevent distortion and cannot be disabled to my knowledge. It’s very obvious on certain tracks and is rather annoying.

Regardless, I wanted to share my installation of a subwoofer in my Dart. I did not want to complicate the installation by choosing a subwoofer that fit within the rear deck opening. I’ve spent years installing car audio and I wanted to keep it simple. By complicate I mean: speaker selection, amplifier selection, sound dampening, rattling and any other aspect of component selection that could be encountered.

Instead I chose the following equipment:

-----------------------

* Rockford Fosgate Punch P300-12 Single 12" Powered Subwoofer Enclosure

-Specifications-
Woofer Size: 12"
System Configuration: Sealed
Power Handling: 300 Watts RMS
Frequency Response: 35Hz to 150Hz
Integrated Amplifier: 300 Watts RMS
Crossover Controls: Variable 50Hz to 200Hz @ 12dB/Octave Butterworth
Tone Controls: Gain & Bass Boost

-Signal Input-
Low-Level: 1 RCA Pair
High-Level: Left/Right Summed Inputs
Power Input Connector: Removable Connector Power/Ground/Remote
Power Wire Gauge: 8 AWG
Heat Sink Type: Extruded Aluminum
Cooling: Convection
Remote Control: Included
Visual Indicators: Power, Protection
Circuit Topology Class: Class-D

-Dimensions-
15 x 19.8 x D1 11 - D2 7 (in)
38.1 x 50.29 x D1 27.94 - D2 17.78 (cm)



* Scosche EFX Delta D Block

-Specifications-
Power and Ground Distribution/Combination Block
Max Input Gauge Size: 4 AWG
Max Output Gauge Size: 1/0 AWG
Fuse Type: Mini AFS


* StreetWires FSAFS40 - 40 Amp AFS Fuses
* StreetWires ZN1K-04 - 4 Gauge Amp Install Kit
* Hitron SPW-16100 - 100 ft. of OFC 16 Gauge Speaker Wire
* 5 ft. Red and Black 4 Gauge Power Wire


-----------------------


I started my installation by reading many of the reviews and experiences of fellow Dart owners. This gave me plenty of insight to possible issues and roadblocks. I also made heavy use of Chrysler’s online wiring site to determine exactly which wires I would need to tap in order to achieve my objectives.

Objectives

  1. Locate passage through firewall
  2. Tap wiring at front door speakers and run leads to trunk
  3. Install amplifier wiring harness and turn-on signal wire from battery to trunk
  4. Run additional wires to front door speakers for future replacements
  5. Run bass boost remote control to front dashboard
  6. Install power/ground distribution block in trunk




The primary area of work is going to be as pictured above. On the 2.0L Tigershark Engine model there is a decent predrilled passage through the firewall that is about 1.5”-2” in diameter with a grommet directly behind the brake pedal.

It is difficult to retrieve this grommet without losing it due to way that it is installed. I tried my best but ultimately it fell down into the engine compartment which is as you know sealed at the bottom. With a bit of ingenuity consisting of a broomstick and a vacuum (don’t ask) I was able to retrieve the factory grommet from the base pan below the engine and I did so just for the sake of it not being permanently lost down there; I used my own grommet that was actually about 6” long and tapered. You cut off the smallest portion that would allow the wires to pass through and zip tie the end. Nice!

In this instance I am working with a 4ga power main and an 18ga amplifier turn-on signal wire both secured inside split loom.

Also in the picture above is the primary wiring channel hidden beneath the hard plastic paneling where you see the factory protective clear plastic protector used to avoid scratches on the rocker panel.




Once the paneling is removed the wiring harness and channel are exposed. I started working here so that I understood the spaces and confines with which I had to work with and allowed me to understand how I would run my power main, speaker, signal wires etc.






Exposed above you can see the main speaker wires for the L/F Door Speaker. They are actually easy to locate if you use Chrysler’s wiring site coupled with the fact that speaker wires are typically twisted. The other twisted pair is for the dash speaker. I will be duplicating my work on the passenger side as well.

The connection used to connect the wiring to the door is amazing and well though out. In older vehicles wiring typically ran straight through the pillar inside a rubber grommet and into the door which made servicing difficult and caused issues with wire chaffing etc. On late model vehicles they’ve opted to make the door Plug N’ Play which is brilliant. You can essentially remove the entire Dart door within minutes as there are two main bolts and a waterproof harness connector which plugs into the pillar. Nice again!

The wires in the image above; the upper leads run to the head unit and the lower leads run to the pillar connection. Instead of just tapping the wires I cut them and then teed them with the speaker wire running back to the trunk. This is the line I will use to obtain audio from the head unit. I also ran a spare speaker line from the same location to the trunk; it is not connected to anything and simply remains in the channel for future use.

This will allow me to replace the stock door speakers in the future and power them with my own amplifier. In which case I would connect the spare speaker line to the lower leads going to the pillar connector/door and the upper leads would stay connected to the main speaker wire going to the trunk.

This will allow me to feed the high output lead from the head unit to multiple components.

I chose the Rockford Fosgate Punch P300-12 Single 12" Powered Subwoofer Enclosure






For the sake of simplicity, this is a well designed, decent sized, powered sub that will be more than adequate for my needs.

Some of the advantages here are that it automatically turns on based on your choice of signal from a 12v source, or audio signal over the speaker line which can be set to work with high input levels.

In essence Rocford Fosgate gives you an all inclusive package to get up and running with minimal investment in multiple products such as an independent high output line converter and no need for a 12v signal line.

But you may be saying to yourself, “Zep you mentioned running a 12v amplifier turn-on lead!” And you’d be correct. Much like the additional speaker line for the front door speakers I also planned for the future.




I love this car!

In the engine compartment you will find your 12v automotive battery. On the battery is a black plastic cover with a red cap over it. The red cap conceals the 12v jump start post in case you need to jump start your vehicle. The black plastic cover (at least on my Limited) contains a spare round opening. How fortuitous to me!




Underneath the black plastic cover is an array of fuses on an odd shaped platform connected to the positive battery post. These fuses serve a couple of different purposes of which exceed the scope of this tutorial.

On this platform I found a spare post that had no connection or nut secured on it. I had a spare lock-nut in my collection of spare parts which met the exact form, fit, and function. This is where I connected my amplifier cable.




The cable itself runs from the battery, down, and up into the fuse box. This is where I placed the inline fuse holder for the amplifier which was included in the StreetWires ZN1K-04 amplifier wiring kit. You always want the inline fuse holder close to the battery. This is close enough and the fuse box offers protection from external elements.

You can also see a blue wire labeled as AMP POWER/SWITCHING. This wire is not connected to anything at this point. This will be used with any possible future amplifiers that lack the automatic audio detection of Rockford’s powered subwoofer. It would be connected to one of the fuses in the fuse box which become energized when the ignition is switched on. In the meantime it will remain coiled and disconnected.

From the fuse box the red 12v / 4ga main power line and blue wire signal wire run out of the backside of the fuse box, down the firewall and through the grommet into the cabin. The cables then run under the dash towards the pillar and along the rocker panel wiring channel all the way to the trunk.

Along with the power and signal lines I've also run my two speaker wires (high level and spare return wire) which are kept separate from the power and 12v signal wire. In addition I also ran the cable for the remote bass boost controller. This is basically a 20 foot long 3.5mm stereo cable.




In this picture I have the Scosche EFX Delta D Block. This is a really well made power and ground distribution block that allows you to distribute to multiple components. I chose this block so that I can add a separate 4 channel amplifier for the door speakers in the future. In the meantime it will distribute power to the Rockford powered enclosure. I installed two 40 AMP fuses in the block. Between the block and the battery there are two points of protection.

I ground down the paint on the interior of the trunk where the ground cable connects and secured it using a self tapping screw. You always want to keep your ground connection as short as possible. In this application I left the ground cable about 1 foot long. The distribution block is secured to the rear deck angle using self tapping screws. Both the power and ground cables enter on the left side of the distribution block.




The high level audio leads coming from the L/F and R/F doors were soldered to pigtails on a clean set of female RCA connectors. Heat shrink was used to finish the soldering work. I did this because the speaker input connector for the Rockford subwoofer came with male RCA connectors. I didn’t want to cut this adapter so I did the next best thing.




The main power connection for the sealed enclosure is a solid block that your cables secure directly into. The unused connection in the middle is to secure the blue 12v signal switching line if it’s used.




In this picture you can see the sealed enclosures power cable, the high input speaker connector and the 3.5mm bass boost connector that goes to the controller mounted on the dash board.




Here is a complete view of all the wiring in the trunk. Secured behind the carpet over the left rear wheel well is about 5 feet of the blue 12v switching cable, and the future speaker wires for the L/F and R/F doors. Whenever I upgrade the door speakers I will also upgrade the rear doors as well. I will have to run additional wiring to them as I have for the fronts.




This is what I consider a clean install. In this picture the sub is lying down. It produces much more punch and is aesthetically pleasing. It doesn't take much trunk space at all.




Removal of the subwoofer takes only a couple of seconds.






Above are a couple of shots with the remote bass level controller. Or as Rockford calls it “Punch Level Controller”. It’s nice to be able to adjust the bass with a single potentiometer rather than navigating a head unit.




Above is a close up of the subwoofers controls and connections.


I hope this helps someone either in the installation of their own system or at least gives someone an idea of what can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
@Nude_Art: Unknow on the ground wire or passenger side colors. Check Chryslers Wiring Website for accuracy. Factory trunk mat... exceptional coverage and rubber grip. Love the look. The fuse box lid comes off by pressing the tab on the side (towards engine) and lifting up.
@RedDragon: Prewiring depends. Crappy answer I know but some folks had found wiring for the 9 speaker Alpine system even though they did not have it and others did not. I'm in the ladder group.
 
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