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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello guys! I have lurked here since I bought my Dart back in 2014, and recently my battery gave up on me so I had to swap it out. To my surprise, the Dart's positive battery terminal is pretty intimidating, and I could not figure out how to get it off until I unbolted just about everything (I'm used to older, simpler cars, like my SRT-4).

Anyways, since I couldn't find a how-to on here already, I decided to make one of my own. Hopefully it helps anyone who has gotten stuck like I did!



Tools:
pcPinQf.jpg

  • 3/8 Ratchet
  • 10mm socket
  • Long extension (I used a 10")

First, let your car cool down some - especially if you have the 1.4L Turbo! The turbo sits about 12" from the battery, so it gets pretty hot. After the car has cooled off a bit, open up the hood, and locate your negative battery terminal. This one is on the right-hand side.

IMAG1119.jpg


When you locate the negative terminal, get your ratchet and socket together and begin loosening the nut on the terminal but don't take it all the way off! You don't want to lose it. Once it is loose, you can wiggle it side to side and it will come free.

IMAG1133.jpg
IMAG1134.jpg


Next, it's time to tackle the positive terminal. There is a plastic housing over the terminal that powers all our fancy electronics like the UConnect, gauge cluster, etc. This housing has a little clip on the left-hand side you can pull up to open it like so:




To remove the terminal, we only have to undo one nut, just like the negative terminal. Loosen the nut that is right next to the terminal (again, don't remove!):



Once that is loosened, you can then close the plastic housing, and wiggle it left and right until it comes free.



Now you can pull off the (potentially gross) battery blanket and set it aside, or you know, hit it a few dozen times to get all the dirt and leaves off :)



Next, we have to remove the battery hold-down, which is located at the base of the battery, towards the front of the car. This is where the long extension comes in handy. Just undo that bolt, remove the bolt and set it aside, then remove the plastic block that holds the battery down.





Now, you can pull that big honkin battery out of there, and put your new one in it's place! Make sure you slip your battery blanket on the new battery.

*** NOTE: The battery I am using in this demonstration was NOT made for the Dart, so it is ill fitting and I do not recommend using it in yours. I am only using it because I can't get a proper battery for a few days, and my original battery would not hold a charge at all. ***


Put the hold-down plastic block back where it goes, and bolt it up:



Slip your positive terminal over the battery's POSITIVE post (this will be marked on your battery). Tighten down the terminal nut to about hand tight, it does not need to be very tight. Close the plastic housing:



Slip your negative terminal over the battery's NEGATIVE post (this will be marked on your battery), and tighten down the terminal nut (it may spark a little!):



And you're done! Admire at your beautiful work and once again reliable Dodge Dart.



Thanks for looking!
 

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Thanks for the information Ghoulie.

This will come in handy when I replace my Battery at some point in the future.

So far so good at 27000 MI.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the information Ghoulie.

This will come in handy when I replace my Battery at some point in the future.

So far so good at 27000 MI.

No problem I am happy to help! This was my Dart's original battery, and it lasted until around 51,000 miles and 3 years. At first it was having trouble cranking in the cold, then one day it just stopped holding any charge whatsoever so I was carrying my Optima and jumpers in my trunk to start it up everywhere I went :p
 

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The dealer replaced the battery on my wife's car a couple weeks ago. Randomly went bad at 20k miles. I reacted the same way when I saw the stuff on top of the positive terminal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
The dealer replaced the battery on my wife's car a couple weeks ago. Randomly went bad at 20k miles. I reacted the same way when I saw the stuff on top of the positive terminal.
Does she have the 1.4L Turbo? It's possible the heat got to it, the little battery cover we have stock doesn't seem the best at keeping out heat. A turbo blanket would probably help a lot with battery life in our cars :)
 

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She drives the 2.0. The 1.4T is mine.
Once that is loosened, you can then close the plastic housing, and wiggle it left and right until it comes free.
Just curious for future reference, is the positive terminal metal clamp somehow attached to the plastic cover, and, therefore, you have to move it(The whole plastic piece.) side to side to free the metal clamp from the post?

Thanks for any reply.
 

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I'll have to bookmark this thread for myself. Mine's still stock from 2013 and from what I've heard these batteries are "ok...ok...ok...ok...ok...BAD!" They just sneak up on you and die. With the winter coming in the following months a new battery is definitely on my mind. Too bad optimus batteries don't fit the Dart, I love those things and was planning on just replacing my stock battery with one shortly after I bought it.
 

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No problem I am happy to help! This was my Dart's original battery, and it lasted until around 51,000 miles and 3 years. At first it was having trouble cranking in the cold, then one day it just stopped holding any charge whatsoever so I was carrying my Optima and jumpers in my trunk to start it up everywhere I went :p
Good job Ghoulie, my battery is about to go so this is a big help. Will I lose all my trip and other data? I read somewhere to jump the terminals to save everything?
 

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Well I just replaced my battery and I ran into a slight issue. I look on the side of the new battery and there's a bag with a 90-degree vent tube and a plug for venting or not venting. I can't remember if the stock battery is vented or not. I looked in the manual and it doesn't say much of anything about the battery specs. I put in the vent tube, thinking I'd be on the safe side, but if anybody can verify if our batteries need to be vented or not that'd be helpful. It's a 1.4 engine, although I'm pretty sure Chrysler put in the same battery in all engine bays.
 

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vent tubes are only for batteries in enclosed areas where hydrogen from the battery 'gassing' can collect without proper ventilation. ie trunks, in cab, or any other enclosed space.

Dont worry about it, plenty of ventilation under the hood for the battery to gas
 

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Well I just replaced my battery and I ran into a slight issue. I look on the side of the new battery and there's a bag with a 90-degree vent tube and a plug for venting or not venting. I can't remember if the stock battery is vented or not. I looked in the manual and it doesn't say much of anything about the battery specs. I put in the vent tube, thinking I'd be on the safe side, but if anybody can verify if our batteries need to be vented or not that'd be helpful. It's a 1.4 engine, although I'm pretty sure Chrysler put in the same battery in all engine bays.
...Smoke, are you worried about passing gas? :question:
 

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...Smoke, are you worried about passing gas? :question:
NO!

I did find after changing the battery out my battery voltage didn't drop quite so drastically when I turned the engine off, and the engine started up with one less crank before firing up. Amazing what a couple tenths of a volt will do.
 

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Nice tutorial.
Well, I started the car (everything normal), drove 60 miles, stopped at the store and 10 minutes later the car won't start. 77920 miles on the '13. Mine seems kind of strange, my meter said that it had 12.8 volts. I connected my other car to it with jumpers and let it charge for a few minutes. Turn the key to "ON" and there is a loud click and everything goes wonky, gauges are bouncing around, the wipers try and run, the digital speedo/ trip meter area displays some psychedelic patterns and when you turn to "Start" the engine only cranks for maybe half a second. Pull the key out and the gauge needles twitch for another 30 seconds or so. So I charged the battery off of my other car for 45 minutes with the negative cable off the car (in case there was a drain issue). I was able to turn the key to the ACC and everything turns on, even the head lights. Turn the key to "ON" and everything looks good. Hit Start and everything goes off. Turned the key off then back on and there was all the lights again, everything normal. Had a buddy help me push start it and it fired right up. Checked the voltage and it read 13.8. Drove it home and turned it off and then immediately tried to start it, no dice. Never seen a battery just die like that with no warning. Crazy.
 

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Update: Took the battery in and had it charged and tested. Charged 12 hours, wouldn't pull 125 amps let alone 500 amps. Battery is toast. Replaced it with one of those AGM batteries, had to remove the one battery spacer to get it to fit.
 

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Update: Took the battery in and had it charged and tested. Charged 12 hours, wouldn't pull 125 amps let alone 500 amps. Battery is toast. Replaced it with one of those AGM batteries, had to remove the one battery spacer to get it to fit.
I did the same thing. The thing with the Dart batteries is they suffer from a bad cell in the battery. They will actually test fine and say they are perfectly good, when indeed it will not start. Sounds like yours was definitely toast though. I want to say I used the same batteries and too had to remove one of the spacers. Ever since I replaced it, it's been perfect.
 
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