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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Good Morning Everyone on the Dodge-Dart.org!

I have found (as far as I looked) that no one has done a front brake rotor and pad how to here yet! Well, I did mine last night using the Brakemotive Rotors and pads from Ebay.
Through a little research I actually found that Brakemotive uses the Powerstop brand pads with their kits... Which as most of you know are a great brake company!

So, without further ado... Lets get started!

What you will need:

- (1) Front brake rotor and pad kit (For each side, driver and passenger)

- 14MM & 19MM 6-point shallow socket

- E20 External Torx socket

- Torque wrench with capabilities of both 32Ft-lbs & 130Ft-lbs

- Car jack

- 3/16 Allan key (Hex key)

- C-clamp

- Hammer (may need, may not)

- Breaker bar

Alright, so I'm going to do a step by step version here and I will add notes as I go so that people understand everything in each picture!

Here is a quick "Before" picture: 14qodsL.jpg

1. First, you want to "break" the lugs using the 19MM socket and the breaker bar... by that, I mean loosen the lug bolts just enough so you are not shaking the car once it is up on the jack/ jack stand...

2. Place the jack at the factory designated jacking point and lift her up till the wheel you are going to work on is off the ground about 3-5".
(There are technically 2 different jacking points on a Dodge Dart... One being the pinch weld behind the rocker panel and the other being the point where they lift at the dealer using the 4-point lifts. I use the latter of the two as I do not have a pinch weld jack.)

3. Remove the lugs and then the wheel...

Should look like this when steps 1-3 are complete: cLfIrkm.jpg

Now, as I do not have jack stands that are small enough for this car I DO NOT recommend leaving the car sitting on the jack for this entire procedure... It is dangerous and if the jack fails the car will fall and potentially hurt or kill you!

Next you are going find the caliper guide pin bolts...

The guide pin bolts are 14MM and look like this: 0fnQkfq.jpg
(Please excuse the extreme close up... Its hard to take a picture in reverse back there!)

There are two of these guide pin bolts, One on top and one on the bottom of the caliper...

4. Using your 14MM socket, loosen and remove both the top and bottom guide pin bolts. (Make sure to use a ratcheting wrench as you do NOT want to break these bolts! REMEMBER lefty, loosy... righty, tighty LOL)

5. After you have removed the guide pin bolts you can pull the caliper off and set it down. (Use a small bucket so you dont put stress on the brake line and break it!)

There is also a gasket on the break line that you will need to pull off the strut in order to move the caliper away from the rotor...

Gasket attached: nnH9IdL.jpg

Gasket Removed: WSijTcR.jpg

After steps 4 & 5 you should be looking something like this:
DlFeuoL.jpg

Make sure that when you remove the caliper, that you DO NOT let it hang or twist the brake line... Have a bucket or box or something to set the caliper on so that there is NO tension or anything on the brake line to the caliper!!!

You can now pull the brake pads out. This should be very easy, and require little effort. Just pull them away from the rotor...

Now you need to find the caliper bracket bolts... These are the E20 External Torx bolts...

Caliper Bracket Bolts: rCzyTaH.jpg
These bolts are ON THERE TIGHT!!!! You will need the breaker bar to remove these as you don't want to break your ratchet... Just make sure to check which way to turn the bolts to loosen them with the ratchet before using the breaker bar!

6. Loosen the bottom caliper bracket bolt. (You will not need to remove it completely)

7. Loosen and remove the top caliper bracket bolt and the bracket should lean down and come to rest.

You should be looking like this now!
jVVk4v2.jpg

Please see my next post for the remainder of the brake replacement...
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Here is part 2...

8. Remove the caliper retaining bolt using a 3/16" Allen Key
LuYJZvm.jpg

9. Remove old rotor.

I forgot to add that if the rotor is seized on the hub you may need to give it a couple good whaps with a hammer around the point of contact with the hub... Make sure not to hit the part of the rotor where the pads make contact! Hit it around the holed area where the wheel would touch when its attached!

After steps 8 & 9 you should be looking at this: qiS3ps2.jpg

10. Place new rotor in the same place the old rotor was and re-install the rotor retaining bolt.

11. Pull the caliper bracket up and back into place and return the bracket bolts to their place.
Tighten the bracket bolts down using your torque wrench to the recommended torque of 130 Ft-lbs.

Once you've done that, It should look like this: 25C01C2.jpg

12. Open the brake fluid reservoir.
This is in your engine bay, the one pictured is on the 1.4 turbo engine: iAACcLO.jpg

13. You'll need to depress the piston inside the caliper in order to fit it over the new brake pads. Take and old pad and place it against the piston, then using your C-clamp depress the piston so it recedes back into the caliper.
1lbDz0B.jpg

Dont go too tight as you can damage the caliper!

14. Place the new pads in the caliper bracket where you removed the old pads from.

15. Replace the caliper back on the bracket and re-install the guide pin bolts (DO NOT TIGHTEN THEM DOWN RIGHT AWAY!)
You need to replace both guide pin bolts before you torque them down, once they are both in... Use your torque wrench and tighten them to the recommended 32Ft-lbs.

Once you have finished the guide pins you will look like this: hJZLpZw.jpg

Dont forget to replace the brake line back into its original place on the strut! Just press the gasket back into the place you pulled it out of.

Then, Place the wheel back onto the hub and replace the lugs bolts using the "star pattern" Get them hand tight, then lower the jack just enough till the tire is making contact with the ground.

Use your torque wrench and torque the lugs down to the 100Ft-lbs that is recommended by the owner's manual, then lower the car all the way down and pull the jack out from under the car!

Here's what it should look like when you are done: wk3Vx2H.jpg

Now, make sure to replace the brake fluid reservoir cap and tighten it down by hand. Then pump the brakes a few times to make sure the calipers are re-compressed on the brake pads!

I dont know much about the break-in procedures for the new pads and rotors, so I just followed the Powerstop break-in procedure HERE.

I hope this helps everyone out! Look forward to a rear rotor and pad replacement thread coming soon!
 

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Nice write up!

I'll add one more idea just for fun. After a couple of leaky caliper replacements on my last car I bought some of the nice grease to put on the guide pins inside the assembly. They're typically easy to remove once you're already that far into the process and helps the caliper to continue to move smoothly. If you do it be careful removing the rubber boots so they don't tear.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nice write up!

I'll add one more idea just for fun. After a couple of leaky caliper replacements on my last car I bought some of the nice grease to put on the guide pins inside the assembly. They're typically easy to remove once you're already that far into the process and helps the caliper to continue to move smoothly. If you do it be careful removing the rubber boots so they don't tear.
O definitely! The only reason I didnt add that is because the guides are still in great condition! the car only has 25k miles on it... I just got such a great deal on the rotors and pads that I wanted to put them on right away! I pushed and pulled a little on the guides to makes sure that they were moving correctly and didnt need any grease.
 

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O definitely! The only reason I didnt add that is because the guides are still in great condition! the car only has 25k miles on it... I just got such a great deal on the rotors and pads that I wanted to put them on right away! I pushed and pulled a little on the guides to makes sure that they were moving correctly and didnt need any grease.
Sounds good and a good call to check to make sure they are still sliding ok. When I did the previous car it was at 100k+ miles and they were not moving so well. Definitely a good idea to check them once you're all the way in there. The incremental work at that time is minimal.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sounds good and a good call to check to make sure they are still sliding ok. When I did the previous car it was at 100k+ miles and they were not moving so well. Definitely a good idea to check them once you're all the way in there. The incremental work at that time is minimal.
Exactly! Thats what I learned when I learned how to do a brake rotor and pad change!
 

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Sifting through just to see the detail; great write-up for DIYers! I'd suggest mentioning to clean and grease the guide/slider pins; I notice you said you didn't see the need but it's good to mention for people working on higher mileage vehicles!
Another thing I'd mention is to PAY ATTENTION TO HOW YOU REMOVED THE CALIPER, so that you can replace it in the correct position! I've seen newbies at the shop twist hoses and force the retainer grommets back into the strut tower clip. People will be kicking themselves in the butt if they scrap hoses from excessive torsion or burn up and seize their calipers or scrap brand new rotors and pads with the restriction on the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sifting through just to see the detail; great write-up for DIYers! I'd suggest mentioning to clean and grease the guide/slider pins; I notice you said you didn't see the need but it's good to mention for people working on higher mileage vehicles!
Another thing I'd mention is to PAY ATTENTION TO HOW YOU REMOVED THE CALIPER, so that you can replace it in the correct position! I've seen newbies at the shop twist hoses and force the retainer grommets back into the strut tower clip. People will be kicking themselves in the butt if they scrap hoses from excessive torsion or burn up and seize their calipers or scrap brand new rotors and pads with the restriction on the line.
Yeah! Ill probably add the guide pin greasing stuff in there... your the second person to mention it now! But yes, as for the caliper... I know exactly what you mean! Thats why I had the little bucket there in one of the pictures so people know NOT to let the caliper hang or anything as to not break the stock lines!
 

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Yeah! Ill probably add the guide pin greasing stuff in there... your the second person to mention it now! But yes, as for the caliper... I know exactly what you mean! Thats why I had the little bucket there in one of the pictures so people know NOT to let the caliper hang or anything as to not break the stock lines!
Which I was glad to see! But I've taught people to do the same, and they've STILL twisted the lines putting the caliper back on and restricted the flow. Just figured it'd be worth mentioning! ;P
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Which I was glad to see! But I've taught people to do the same, and they've STILL twisted the lines putting the caliper back on and restricted the flow. Just figured it'd be worth mentioning! ;P
LOL, well unfortunately... you cant fix stupid
 

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LOL, well unfortunately... you cant fix stupid
Sadly, we've seen that far too many times... 2005 Ford Econoline E-350, front brake pads. Mechanic who had finished his course less than a year before. Managed to literally BREAK the caliper and scrap a rim in the process... guy's reaction was somewhere along the lines of, "I thought it was normal that I had trouble installing the caliper". Here's hoping people will see this thread before they do the same or worse if they don't have the know-how already!
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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I hope you didn't forget to put 8. Remove the caliper retaining bolt using a 3/16" Allen Key back :)

Nice write up, this is what I'm going to do next, in a few weeks, wanted this week, but need to be at Silicon Valley Comic Con :)
 

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I hope you didn't forget to put 8. Remove the caliper retaining bolt using a 3/16" Allen Key back :)

Nice write up, this is what I'm going to do next, in a few weeks, wanted this week, but need to be at Silicon Valley Comic Con :)
O i didnt! LOL you gotta re-read #10 ;)
 

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I would suggest before putting the new rotor on to clean up the mating surface on the bearing of rust and put a little bit of grease on there to keep it from rust welding together.
 
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