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Discussion Starter #1
So recently, I took my car into my local tenured car shop. I trust them because they did an engine swap for me on my other car.
But here’s my dilemma. I had a fairly large oil leak, I had them drop some dye in the car to see what it was, drove it around for a while and they diagnosed it being the brake booster seal. So I had that replaced. I also had a heavy knocking in my wheel, so I asked them to look into just since they’d have the car up anyway. Turned out, the rack and pinion shaft, the one that attached to the I-shaft, had somehow became damaged, so the rack and pinion assembly needed replaced.
I authorized the repair just because I wasn’t in the mood to do it myself. I opted for a low mileage refurbished one since it was~$200 versus a brand new one being about $900. Replaced it all, steering is much better, no more knocking. But here’s the trouble, my power steering is out. The module on the refurbished one is not wanting to sync to the car. I even took it to dodge to have them flash the BCM/ECM and they couldnt get it to pair either. This means that the module in the refurbed one was never un-paired/replaced, so my power steering has since been out.
So I was wondering if anybody else had this issue or would know how to fix it. I still have the old R&P so if possible I could swap the necessary module out, but I do not which one it is.
Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I was also reading on some other threads of people taking the modules off their old units to reuse on the new one, so I feel it’s entirely possible to do so in my case as well. Just not quite sure where the module is at and how to swap it
 

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The EPS module is part of the multifunction switch. I am not sure if replacing it with the one from the donor car is the fix. I have pulled several of them from wrecked Darts and sold them to members that had broken their multifunction switch and never heard a complaint.

08 - Electrical / 8E - Electronic Control Modules / MODULE, Steering Column / Description

DESCRIPTION

125421

The Steering Control Module (SCM) for this vehicle is a microcontroller based electronics unit internal to the molded plastic Steering Column Control Module (SCCM) mounting housing (2). The SCCM mounting housing is located near the top of the steering column directly below the steering wheel. The SCCM mounting housing includes the multifunction switch (1) and the SCM, which is also a Local Interface Network (LIN) master node and a gateway to the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus. The clockspring (3) snaps over the top of the SCCM mounting housing. For additional information on the clockspring, (Refer to 10 - Restraints/CLOCKSPRING/Description) . For additional information on the multifunction switch, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/Lamps/Lighting - Exterior/SWITCH, Multifunction/Description) .

The SCCM mounting housing is aligned on the steering column jacket by a plastic latch feature that snaps over a small lug integral to the outer circumference of the upper steering column housing, then a metal clamp with a single screw tightens the unit to the steering column. There are lugs cast into the outer circumference of the steering wheel hub that engage the inner circumference of the clockspring rotor hub to drive the clockspring and to disengage a small red plastic spring-loaded blocker that locks the clockspring rotor hub to the clockspring housing until the steering wheel is properly installed. The steering wheel hub disengages the blocker when properly installed. The steering wheel must be tightened to specification to ensure proper clockspring function.

The SCCM mounting housing includes an integral connector insulator that faces toward the instrument panel. However, the terminal pins that populate this insulator are integral to the clockspring and are connected to the vehicle electrical system through a take out and connector of the instrument panel wire harness. The SCCM mounting housing also has an interconnect receptacle that faces toward the steering wheel. This receptacle accepts the fixed terminal pins of the clockspring half of the interconnect, which consists of several circuits that pass through the clockspring dedicated to connecting the SCM to the vehicle electrical system.

The SCCM mounting housing, the multifunction switch as well as the SCM LIN master node and CAN gateway electronics unit cannot be adjusted or repaired. If ineffective or damaged the entire SCCM mounting housing, multifunction switch and SCM must be replaced as a unit. The clockspring is available for separate service replacement.



There is a EPS relearn procedure. I checked alfaOBD and do not see it there. Perhaps the developer can add that feature.

Alexey Chernikov alfaOBD developer [email protected]

This is from the FSM:

28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) / Standard Procedure EPS LEARN PROCEDURE

PERFORMING EPS LEARN PROCEDURE

NOTE:
If the Steering Gear or the Steering Column were replaced, it is necessary to perform the PROXI Alignment routine before continuing with this procedure. A diagnostic scan tool MUST be used to align the PROXI configuration data into the new ECU. Follow the routine outlined in the diagnostic scan tool for PROXI Configuration Alignment under Body Control Module (BCM) Miscellaneous Functions menu.

1. Using the scan tool, perform the EPS Learn procedure.

2. With the scan tool, read the EPS DTCs.

Are there any DTCs present?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate diagnostic procedure(s). (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) /Diagnosis and Testing) .

No

•Test Complete
•Perform the EPS VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electronic Power Steering (EPS) - Standard Procedure).



28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) / Standard Procedure EPS VERIFICATION TEST


EPS VERIFICATION TEST

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Remove all test equipment.

3. Connect all previously disconnected components and connectors.

4. Verify all accessories are turned off, the battery is fully charged and the charging system has a status of "charged".

5. Verify that the ignition is on. With the scan tool, record and erase all Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) from all modules. Start the engine and allow it to run for two minutes and fully operate the system that was indicating the failure.

NOTE:
Turn the steering wheel from stop to stop, holding at each stop position for One second.

6. Turn the ignition off and wait five minutes. Turn the ignition on and using the scan tool, read DTCs from all modules.

7. If there are no DTCs present after turning ignition on, road test the vehicle for at least five minutes.

8. Again, with the scan tool read DTCs. If any DTCs are present, refer to the Table of Contents in the applicable section for the Diagnostic procedure and troubleshoot the new or recurring symptom.

9. If there are no DTCs present and the customer's concern can no longer be duplicated, the repair is complete.

Are any DTCs present or is the original concern still present?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate diagnostic procedure. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) /Diagnosis and Testing) .

No

•Repair is complete.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Now, this is the crazy thing. After having the R&P replaced, I took it to dodge to have the reflash/relearn the steering situation, and it is saying that it still cannot connect to the R&P computer. My theory, which makes sense to me at least, is the computer attached to the R&P, which controls the EPS unit, is not synced to the car. That is what dodge has informed me of at least. So since I have my old unit still, I was thinking of taking the computer off the old R&P and swapping it with the unit that is on my vehicle now. Given that it has already been synced to my car before, I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t still if out back on. Since the computer/motor can be detached, I could just put the old one on the new R&P, and if it doesn’t sync right away, I feel that it would sync if taken to dodge.
But does my issue seem common?? Like the computer of the EPS not being able to be read at all. And do you think putting the original computer back on to the new R&P that is on my car? Or do you think I should have them send the unit that’s on the car back and have them install another unit all together?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The EPS module is part of the multifunction switch. I am not sure if replacing it with the one from the donor car is the fix. I have pulled several of them from wrecked Darts and sold them to members that had broken their multifunction switch and never heard a complaint.

08 - Electrical / 8E - Electronic Control Modules / MODULE, Steering Column / Description

DESCRIPTION

View attachment 125421
The Steering Control Module (SCM) for this vehicle is a microcontroller based electronics unit internal to the molded plastic Steering Column Control Module (SCCM) mounting housing (2). The SCCM mounting housing is located near the top of the steering column directly below the steering wheel. The SCCM mounting housing includes the multifunction switch (1) and the SCM, which is also a Local Interface Network (LIN) master node and a gateway to the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus. The clockspring (3) snaps over the top of the SCCM mounting housing. For additional information on the clockspring, (Refer to 10 - Restraints/CLOCKSPRING/Description) . For additional information on the multifunction switch, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/Lamps/Lighting - Exterior/SWITCH, Multifunction/Description) .

The SCCM mounting housing is aligned on the steering column jacket by a plastic latch feature that snaps over a small lug integral to the outer circumference of the upper steering column housing, then a metal clamp with a single screw tightens the unit to the steering column. There are lugs cast into the outer circumference of the steering wheel hub that engage the inner circumference of the clockspring rotor hub to drive the clockspring and to disengage a small red plastic spring-loaded blocker that locks the clockspring rotor hub to the clockspring housing until the steering wheel is properly installed. The steering wheel hub disengages the blocker when properly installed. The steering wheel must be tightened to specification to ensure proper clockspring function.

The SCCM mounting housing includes an integral connector insulator that faces toward the instrument panel. However, the terminal pins that populate this insulator are integral to the clockspring and are connected to the vehicle electrical system through a take out and connector of the instrument panel wire harness. The SCCM mounting housing also has an interconnect receptacle that faces toward the steering wheel. This receptacle accepts the fixed terminal pins of the clockspring half of the interconnect, which consists of several circuits that pass through the clockspring dedicated to connecting the SCM to the vehicle electrical system.

The SCCM mounting housing, the multifunction switch as well as the SCM LIN master node and CAN gateway electronics unit cannot be adjusted or repaired. If ineffective or damaged the entire SCCM mounting housing, multifunction switch and SCM must be replaced as a unit. The clockspring is available for separate service replacement.



There is a EPS relearn procedure. I checked alfaOBD and do not see it there. Perhaps the developer can add that feature.

Alexey Chernikov alfaOBD developer [email protected]

This is from the FSM:

28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) / Standard Procedure EPS LEARN PROCEDURE

PERFORMING EPS LEARN PROCEDURE

NOTE:
If the Steering Gear or the Steering Column were replaced, it is necessary to perform the PROXI Alignment routine before continuing with this procedure. A diagnostic scan tool MUST be used to align the PROXI configuration data into the new ECU. Follow the routine outlined in the diagnostic scan tool for PROXI Configuration Alignment under Body Control Module (BCM) Miscellaneous Functions menu.

1. Using the scan tool, perform the EPS Learn procedure.

2. With the scan tool, read the EPS DTCs.

Are there any DTCs present?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate diagnostic procedure(s). (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) /Diagnosis and Testing) .

No

•Test Complete
•Perform the EPS VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electronic Power Steering (EPS) - Standard Procedure).



28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) / Standard Procedure EPS VERIFICATION TEST


EPS VERIFICATION TEST

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Remove all test equipment.

3. Connect all previously disconnected components and connectors.

4. Verify all accessories are turned off, the battery is fully charged and the charging system has a status of "charged".

5. Verify that the ignition is on. With the scan tool, record and erase all Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) from all modules. Start the engine and allow it to run for two minutes and fully operate the system that was indicating the failure.

NOTE:
Turn the steering wheel from stop to stop, holding at each stop position for One second.

6. Turn the ignition off and wait five minutes. Turn the ignition on and using the scan tool, read DTCs from all modules.

7. If there are no DTCs present after turning ignition on, road test the vehicle for at least five minutes.

8. Again, with the scan tool read DTCs. If any DTCs are present, refer to the Table of Contents in the applicable section for the Diagnostic procedure and troubleshoot the new or recurring symptom.

9. If there are no DTCs present and the customer's concern can no longer be duplicated, the repair is complete.

Are any DTCs present or is the original concern still present?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate diagnostic procedure. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) /Diagnosis and Testing) .

No

•Repair is complete.
See reply above. Forgot to tag you oops
 

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There is only a steering angle sensor on the steering rack and there is no description of how to remove it. The FSM says the steering rack is not to be disassembled and must be replaced as a unit. The SCM is right behind the steering wheel, part of the multifunction switch. Have you tried the reset procedure turning the steering wheel stop to stop? I have sent a message to the alfaOBD developer about adding the EPS relearn procedure. I will post what Alexey says. All that stuff is buried in the FSM and it's possible the dealer techs are unaware of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is only a steering angle sensor on the steering rack and there is no description of how to remove it. The FSM says the steering rack is not to be disassembled and must be replaced as a unit. The SCM is right behind the steering wheel, part of the multifunction switch. Have you tried the reset procedure turning the steering wheel stop to stop? I have sent a message to the alfaOBD developer about adding the EPS relearn procedure. I will post what Alexey says. All that stuff is buried in the FSM and it's possible the dealer techs are unaware of it.
Oh okay gotcha. So then having the computers attached the R&P units swapped would be highly un-suggested lol. I just feel that since that old computer is just held on with a few bolts and a belt, wouldn’t be too hard to switch them and allow easier programming.
But no, personally I have not done anything as I do not have access to the tools needed to re-learn/reprogram the steering. The shop I had do the work said they couldn’t get it to program, which is why I brought it to dodge. They couldn’t get it to program either. So basically I paid dodge to flash my BCM for nothing really besides making the mileage stop flashing, which it did, just never synced the EPS components.
But so far, it’s sounding that if I can’t get the units to sync, I’ll have to have the shop take the current unit out and retry with another unit, which I’m sure will be more money I’m not 100% okay with spending 🙄.
 

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It's possible the dealer tech did not know about the relearn. There should be a way to make this work. You can't be the only person to have this problem.
The OBDLinkMX bluetooth scanner and alfaOBD android app will set you back around $110 and will let you access all modules on the Dart and newer FCA vehicles.
Most likely, the dealer did a PROXI not a BCM flash. The OBDLinkMX and alfaOBD can do the PROXI. What you paid the dealer to do it would have paid for the tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
There is only a steering angle sensor on the steering rack and there is no description of how to remove it. The FSM says the steering rack is not to be disassembled and must be replaced as a unit. The SCM is right behind the steering wheel, part of the multifunction switch. Have you tried the reset procedure turning the steering wheel stop to stop? I have sent a message to the alfaOBD developer about adding the EPS relearn procedure. I will post what Alexey says. All that stuff is buried in the FSM and it's possible the dealer techs are unaware of it.
Oh okay gotcha. So then having the computers attached the R&P units swapped would be highly un-suggested lol. I just feel that since that old computer is just held on with a few bolts and a belt, wouldn’t be too hard to switch them and allow easier programming.
But no, personally I have not done anything as I do not have access to the tools needed to re-learn/reprogram the steering. The shop I had do the work said they couldn’t get it to program, which is why I brought it to dodge. They couldn’t get it to program either. So basically I paid dodge to flash my BCM for nothing really besides making the mileage stop flashing, which it did, just never synced the EPS components.
But so far, it’s sounding that if I can’t get the units to sync, I’ll have to have the shop take the current unit out and retry with another unit, which I’m sure will be more money I’m not 100% okay with spending 🙄
It's possible the dealer tech did not know about the relearn. There should be a way to make this work. You can't be the only person to have this problem.
The OBDLinkMX bluetooth scanner and alfaOBD android app will set you back around $110 and will let you access all modules on the Dart and newer FCA vehicles.
I would be HIGHLY surprised and pi$$ed off if they did it wrong. Because I specifically went in there and told them I replaced the R&P and that I have the compatibility error(flashing mileage) and I would like a BCM reflash and relearn of the steering system for that exact reason.
going to upload a picture of what they did and the DTC that’s still present since having it done. Maybe that can shed some light onto this.
But kind of getting irritated and it’s only been a week since having this done😂. I mean me personally, I love the way it handles without the EPS, feels more like my other car which has a V6 and hydraulic PS. But in terms of the message that keeps popping up and that also harming value of the car, it’s annoying.
 

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I think what you are calling a computer on the steering rack is the steering angle sensor. Could you post a pic? I haven't seen a steering rack up close yet at a junkyard. Do you know the code it is setting?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's possible the dealer tech did not know about the relearn. There should be a way to make this work. You can't be the only person to have this problem.
The OBDLinkMX bluetooth scanner and alfaOBD android app will set you back around $110 and will let you access all modules on the Dart and newer FCA vehicles.
Most likely, the dealer did a PROXI not a BCM flash. The OBDLinkMX and alfaOBD can do the PROXI. What you paid the dealer to do it would have paid for the tools.
Going to add pics as a separate reply.
but the first pic is the work up of when I went to dodge. They flashed my BCM and tried to sync the steering components, says theres still an active EPS code. If I say the code itself, I’d know. It it’s whatever one says “lost connection to power steering” and it’s a U code.
second picture is of the steering rack itself. The yellow box is the EPS computer that I was referring to earlier. There’s a module in there that the U code is for. The wires circled in red run to the steering position sensor in the section that the I-shaft connect. The other 2: one being the 12V power supply, the other plugging into sometbing that reads the EPS module and conditions of the system. What’s in yellow is what I referring to of swapping the one off the one rack and putting on the new rack currently on the car. Because my theory is the module in the old computer hub thing, seeing as it was already synced to my car, would have not trouble resyncing. And it’s only held on by a few bolts and a little belt. But I don’t know if it’s possible that’ll fix the issue or if anybody has done it to verify.
My only other option seems to be have them take the rack currently on the car off and try again with another hoping that it’ll sync. And what’s even weirder is the traction control is fine, no lights or issues with that, just the lost power steering.
 

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According to the invoice pic, they just did a PROXI for $100. Since you have the original steering rack, you can try removing the EPS module, but be aware it is not supposed to be disassembled according to the FSM. Many of the the Dart modules are married to each other with the VIN. If you find that something inside is soldered and you have soldering skills, you could try swapping the modules. You have nothing to lose with at least trying to remove the module.
I assume this is the U-code:
U0131-87-LOST COMMUNICATION WITH ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE - MISSING MESSAGE


28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Body Control (BCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

U0131-87-LOST COMMUNICATION WITH ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE - MISSING MESSAGE

Theory of Operation

The primary communication network between electronic control modules is the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus system. The Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus allows all electronic modules connected to the bus to share information with each other. Regardless of whether a message originates from a module on the higher speed CAN C (500K) Bus or on the lower speed bus, CAN Interior High Speed (IHS) (125K) Bus, the message structure and layout is similar, which allows the Body Control Module (BCM) to process and transfer messages between the CAN buses. The BCM stores Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) for certain bus network faults on the CAN C (500K) Bus and CAN IHS (125K) Bus.

The CAN bus modules are connected in parallel to the two-wire bus using a twisted pair, where the wires are wrapped around each other to provide shielding from unwanted electromagnetic induction, thus preventing interference with the relatively low voltage signals being carried through them. While the CAN bus is operating (active), one of the bus wires will carry a higher voltage and is referred to as the CAN High or CAN bus (+) wire, while the other bus wire will carry a lower voltage and is referred to as the CAN Low or CAN bus (-) wire.

For additional information on the communication network and star connector locations, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/COMMUNICATION - Description) .


•When Monitored:
With the ignition on for at least five seconds.

Battery voltage between 10 and 16 volts.

Body Control Module (BCM) is configured correctly.

•Set Condition:
Bus messages not received from the Electric Power Steering Module (EPS) for approximately two to five seconds.


Possible Causes

CAN C BUS (+) CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
CAN C BUS (-) CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
DTCS RELATED TO BATTERY VOLTAGE, IGNITION, OR VIN MESSAGES
BCM NOT CONFIGURED CORRECTLY
EPS POWER AND GROUND
ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE (EPS)
MODULE THAT SET THIS DTC


1.VERIFY DTC IS ACTIVE

NOTE: Make sure the battery voltage is between 10 and 16 volts before proceeding.

1. With the scan tool, read active DTCs.

Is this DTC active?

Yes

•Go To 2

No

•(Refer to 29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics/Communication - Diagnosis and Testing) and perform the Stored Lost Communication DTCs diagnostic procedure.


2.CHECK FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ACTIVE DTCS

1. With the scan tool, read all active DTCs from all modules.

NOTE: Check for BCM configuration, CAN C hardware electrical, VIN Missing/Mismatch, battery or ignition related DTCs.

Does the scan tool display any active DTCs to the conditions listed above?

Yes

•(Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Diagnosis and Testing) and perform the appropriate diagnostic procedure.

No

•Go To 3


3.VERIFY THE ELECTRIC POWER STEERING (EPS) MODULE IS ACTIVE ON THE BUS

1. Turn the ignition on.

2. With the scan tool, verify the EPS Module is active on the bus.

Is the EPS Module active on the bus?

Yes

•Go To 4

No

•(Refer to 29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics/Communication - Diagnosis and Testing) and perform the NO RESPONSE FROM EPS MODULE (ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE) diagnostic procedure.


4.CHECK FOR ADDITIONAL COMMUNICATION RELATED DTCS

1. With the scan tool, read all the DTCs.

Is there more than one module with active DTCs “Logged Against” the EPS Module?

Yes

•Replace/update the Electric Power Steering (EPS) Module in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the EPS MODULE VERIFICATION TEST. Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Electric Power Steering (EPS) /Standard Procedure.

No

•Go To 5


5.CLEAR DTC IN MODULE SETTING FAULT

1. With the scan tool, select the module setting the DTC against the EPS Module.

2. Clear active DTCs.

Is this DTC still active?

Yes

•Replace/update the module that set this DTC in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate verification test for the module being replaced. If there is no verification test for the associated module perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 6



6.CYCLE IGNITION

1. Cycle the ignition from RUN to OFF three times ending with the key in the RUN position.

Does this DTC become active?

Yes

•Go To 7

No

•The condition is not present at this time. Using the wiring diagram/schematic as a guide, inspect the wiring for chafed, pierced, pinched and partially broken wires and the wiring harness connectors for broken, bent, pushed out and corroded terminals.
•Perform the appropriate verification test for the module. If there is no verification test for the associated module perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).



7.CHECK FOR ADDITIONAL LOST COMMUNICATION FAULTS

1. With the scan tool, view the modules.

Does the BCM and other CAN C BUS modules show Lost Communication with the remaining CAN C BUS modules?

Yes

•Go To 8

No

•Replace/update the module that set this DTC in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate verification test for the module being replaced. If there is no verification test for the associated module perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).



8.CHECK THE CAN C BUS (+) CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO VOLTAGE

125424


1. Measure the voltage between the (D57) CAN C Bus (+) circuit and ground.

Is the voltage above 5.0 volts?

Yes

•Repair the short to voltage in the CAN C Bus (+) circuit. The short to voltage is present in one of the CAN C Bus circuits. Use the Star Connectors to isolate portions of the CAN C Bus in order to locate the concern.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 9



9.CHECK THE CAN C BUS (-) CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO GROUND

125425


1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Measure the resistance between ground and the (D58) CAN C Bus (-) circuit.

Is the resistance below 10k Ohms?

Yes

•Repair the short to ground in the CAN C Bus (-) circuit. The short to ground is present in one of the CAN C Bus circuits. Use the Star Connectors to isolate portions of the CAN C Bus in order to locate the concern.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Replace/update the module that set this DTC in accordance with the Service Information.
•Perform the appropriate verification test for the module being replaced. If there is no verification test for the associated module perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yep, that’s the code. Just prevent the power steering module from syncing. Though, I have plenty of reason to believe that the module is built into the motor, so like it’s all one piece. So that’s what I would attempt to swap from my old one. And according to a Chevy Cruz EPS, it seems totally doable(video linked). Seems I can just remove the motor, assembly and circuit board all in one go, and just move it off to the new one. Is it ideal, no doesn’t seem like it. But would it save me money, yes lots of it. And Would be good for the community to know if that works, because if it does, in theory you could probably just buy a used R&P and swap the motor/module and be just fine. My only thing is, if it doesn’t work, then I would’ve destroyed 2 R&P, can’t return the refurbed one on the car now, and would still have to pay to get another. So not quite sure hitch route to take honestly. After lots of thought, I feel like I should just tinker with the old R&P and just get a refurbed replacement one on the car, and just see if I can even take the one one apart. I go in tomorrow to talk to the shop that worked on the car to see what they think, but I’m sure they’ll just say send the faulty refurb back and get it replaced 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yep, that’s the code. Just prevent the power steering module from syncing. Though, I have plenty of reason to believe that the module is built into the motor, so like it’s all one piece. So that’s what I would attempt to swap from my old one. And according to a Chevy Cruz EPS, it seems totally doable(video linked). Seems I can just remove the motor, assembly and circuit board all in one go, and just move it off to the new one. Is it ideal, no doesn’t seem like it. But would it save me money, yes lots of it. And Would be good for the community to know if that works, because if it does, in theory you could probably just buy a used R&P and swap the motor/module and be just fine. My only thing is, if it doesn’t work, then I would’ve destroyed 2 R&P, can’t return the refurbed one on the car now, and would still have to pay to get another. So not quite sure hitch route to take honestly. After lots of thought, I feel like I should just tinker with the old R&P and just get a refurbed replacement one on the car, and just see if I can even take the one one apart. I go in tomorrow to talk to the shop that worked on the car to see what they think, but I’m sure they’ll just say send the faulty refurb back and get it replaced 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

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If the Dart steering rack motor is as easy as the one in that video, I would go for it. You may need to have a PROXI done again if that was the problem because the BCM will now see the EPS and will need to be configured to use it. If you get the blinking odometer, that almost always means a PROXI needs to be done. Get the OBDLinkMX bluetooth scanner and the alfaOBD android app for about $109 and never be at the mercy of a dealer again. It will access all modules and do the PROXI.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thats my only dilemma, I have no idea how easy it may or may not be. Because all EPS are based off I feel like the same general design. Some plugs here and there, the computer with various modules attached, and a belt/chain of some sort attaching the motor to the actual rack. I honestly also have no idea if that motor assembly actually houses the module. Dodge said it’s built into the R&P, but seeing as how the internals of the rack HAVE to be some sort of teeth and shaft combo, it has to be external. So my guess would actually just in the motor itself. I think I’m going to take the old rack apart to see what’s inside and how it comes apart, mostly focusing on if it’s possible to swap the motor without having to take the rack off the car again. But if it’s too complicated, might just opt for a refurbed rack. Strange to me though how all the manuals out there, and service people I spoke with, and threads from darts, nobody seems to have the darndest clue as to if anything I’m saying is legitimate or even been attempted 😂
 

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Some more from the FSM. Check the wiring and fuse.

19 - Steering / Gear / Description

125427


DESCRIPTION

The steering gear is the rack-and-pinion type with Electric Power Assist (EPS). It is mounted on the front suspension crossmember, and the front crossmember must be removed from the vehicle to service the steering gear. The only serviceable parts of the steering gear are the inner tie rods, outer tie rods, and the inner tie rod bellows.

The EPS system is only serviced as an assembly, including the Steering Angle Sensor (SAS). If the SAS requires replacement, the entire steering gear must be replaced.

NOTE:
If a NEW steering gear is installed, programming is required
EPS VERIFICATION TEST
EPS LEARN PROCEDURE



29 - Non-DTC Diagnostics / Communication / Diagnosis and Testing

NO RESPONSE FROM EPS (ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE)

125426


Possible Causes

FUSED IGNITION SWITCH OUTPUT (RUN-START) CIRCUIT OPEN
FUSED B (+) CIRCUIT OPEN
GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN
CAN C BUS CIRCUITS OPEN
ELECTRIC POWER STEERING MODULE (EPS)

Diagnostic Test

1.TEST FOR INTERMITTENT CONDITION

1. Turn the ignition on.

NOTE: Make sure the battery voltage is between 10.0 and 16.0 volts.

2. With the scan tool, read the module status.

NOTE: Check the BCM for any active CAN hardware DTCs, perform DTC before proceeding.

Does the scan tool indicate that the module is active on the bus?

Yes

•The no response condition is not present at this time. Using the wiring diagram/schematic as a guide, inspect the wiring for chafed, pierced, pinched, and partially broken wires and the wiring harness connectors for broken, bent, pushed out, and corroded terminals.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 2


2.CHECK THE (F942) FUSED IGNITION SWITCH OUTPUT (RUN/START) CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN OR SHORT TO GROUND

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the EHPS harness connector.

3. Turn the ignition on.

4. Using a 12-volt test light connected to ground, check the (F942) Fused Ignition Switch Output (Run/Start) circuit.

Does the test light illuminate brightly?

Yes

•Go To 3

No

•Repair the open or short to ground on the (F942) Fused Ignition Switch Output (Run/Start) circuit.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).


3.CHECK THE (A950) FUSED B(+) CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN OR SHORT TO GROUND

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Using a 12-volt test light connected to ground, check the (A950) Fused B(+) circuit.

Does the test light illuminate brightly?

Yes

•Go To 4

No

•Repair the open or short to ground on the (A950) Fused B(+) circuit.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).


4.CHECK THE (Z907) GROUND CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN

1. Using a 12-volt test light connected to 12-volts, check each (Z907) Ground circuit.

Does the test light illuminate brightly for each circuit?

Yes

•Go To 5

No

•Repair the open in the (Z907) Ground circuit.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).


5.CHECK THE (D138) AND (D139) CAN C BUS CIRCUITS FOR AN OPEN

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the CAN C Body C5 Star Connector.

3. Measure the resistance of the (D138) CAN C Bus (-) circuit between the CAN C Body C5 Star Connector and the EHPS harness connector.

4. Measure the resistance of the (D139) CAN C Bus (+) circuit between the CAN C Body C5 Star Connector and the EHPS harness connector.


Are the resistances below 5.0 Ohms?

Yes

•Replace the Electric Power Steering (EPS) Module in accordance with the Service Information. (Refer to 19 - Steering/Gear/Removal) .
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Repair the open in the (D138) or (D139) CAN C Bus circuit. Inspect the connector for damage.
•Perform the BODY VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Body Control (BCM) - Standard Procedure).
 

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I received a reply about the EPS relearn procedure from the developer of alfaOBD.


Case,

Yes the procedure is missing currently, thank you for letting me know. I will add it in the next update.

Best regards,
Alexey

So, if you can wait, this may be something that you can do yourself. In the meantime, you can purchase the app and the OBDLinkMX. You will need an android device, there is no iOS version.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I have some interesting updates. Went and picked up my old steering rack and spoke with the shop, and we both came to the conclusion that the rack that was on my car that was broken, was NOT an OEM part. And if it was, was out of character. Had yellow paint-pen writing on it, which signifies used part. However, the weirdest thing, it synced to my car, and according to dodge, if it was used, it shouldn’t have. So tomorrow, the shop is having a coding guy come in to try and replicate the coding used on the old unit to try and get my current racks EPS module to sync. I don’t believe they are charging me anything as this is something that is not anyone’s fault but the part that was installed. They said they can try and replicate the modules coding/software and redo the steering re-learn procedure. And going from there, if that doesn’t work, they are going to remove the current rack and send it back and then reinstall another one.
They were not too fond of my EPS motor idea, but said I’m more than welcome to try on my own but they will not. So hoping tomorrow late afternoon or night I’ll have another update. But so far, still no power steering and nobody can seem to figure out why
 
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