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Awesome do you have any idea on what was approved and where it went?

Also what issues are you having with your car? You said it had nothing to do with the TCM, so what are the issues and what has been the reason it's been in the shop for that long?

It's a class action lawsuit for the clutch in the manual transmission, and it is limited to 2013-2016 Darts purchased "from authorized dealers" in California, so basically if you have a manual Dart bought new from an FCA dealership in California. This isn't likely to go very far. The clutch is an inherent wear part, and since driving habits are pretty much impossible to prove, FCA will likely be successful by claiming that they can't reasonably be held responsible for excessive wear outside of the specified 12-month/12,000 mile (whichever comes first) warranty, which is an industry standard warranty. They will also probably point out that cars that have the root problem noted by the defendant have an obvious symptom where the clutch pedal stays stuck to the floor, and that any owners of vehicles with this problem who continued to drive their vehicles even once with the problem in evidence bear the full responsibility for any resulting damage to the clutch. They will probably provide engineering reports and QA testing documents to show that their correction to the identified problem was correct and sufficient. Even if the case is decided in favor of the defendants initially, it will be appealed and ultimately any "award" will probably amount to what FCA has already done, an extended warranty on the affected parts with no-charge repairs.

These kind of class-action lawsuits are usually pretty pointless, because people end up putting in a lot of time and effort into proving a point that is worth, in the best case scenario, an award worth maybe a few hundred dollars (assuming they still have the car by the end of the process and get any value from an extended or life-time warranty on the affected parts/system) and no real consequences for the automaker. Here is a typical example (I'm pretty sure in this case Subaru even admitted to having known the engines had a defect that caused excessive oil consumption while publicly claiming the engines were operating normally):


Audi/VW Group had a similar lawsuit where they probably would have won completely in the end but chose to settle without admitting fault. If you read it, the settlement was extremely specific in what was covered by reimbursement (a specific service, only covered if it was performed by an authorized dealer), and there was a 2 week window to submit claims (you basically had to already be aware or tough cookies).

 

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It's a class action lawsuit for the clutch in the manual transmission, and it is limited to 2013-2016 Darts purchased "from authorized dealers" in California, so basically if you have a manual Dart bought new from an FCA dealership in California. This isn't likely to go very far. The clutch is an inherent wear part, and since driving habits are pretty much impossible to prove, FCA will likely be successful by claiming that they can't reasonably be held responsible for excessive wear outside of the specified 12-month/12,000 mile (whichever comes first) warranty, which is an industry standard warranty. They will also probably point out that cars that have the root problem noted by the defendant have an obvious symptom where the clutch pedal stays stuck to the floor, and that any owners of vehicles with this problem who continued to drive their vehicles even once with the problem in evidence bear the full responsibility for any resulting damage to the clutch. They will probably provide engineering reports and QA testing documents to show that their correction to the identified problem was correct and sufficient. Even if the case is decided in favor of the defendants initially, it will be appealed and ultimately any "award" will probably amount to what FCA has already done, an extended warranty on the affected parts with no-charge repairs.

These kind of class-action lawsuits are usually pretty pointless, because people end up putting in a lot of time and effort into proving a point that is worth, in the best case scenario, an award worth maybe a few hundred dollars (assuming they still have the car by the end of the process and get any value from an extended or life-time warranty on the affected parts/system) and no real consequences for the automaker. Here is a typical example (I'm pretty sure in this case Subaru even admitted to having known the engines had a defect that caused excessive oil consumption while publicly claiming the engines were operating normally):


Audi/VW Group had a similar lawsuit where they probably would have won completely in the end but chose to settle without admitting fault. If you read it, the settlement was extremely specific in what was covered by reimbursement (a specific service, only covered if it was performed by an authorized dealer), and there was a 2 week window to submit claims (you basically had to already be aware or tough cookies).

Ahh so that poster I replied to was incorrect on their information it seems. First post and sounded like they just wanted to say how bad their car is. It's pretty common.
 
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