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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done a few searches and haven't really found much info so hoping someone can help or point me in the right direction if I missed something.

I recently acquired a 2013 Dart Aero with transmission issues. Unfortunately for me, I did not do enough research (or was misled by info I found online) and thought it had a normal TC-style automatic. However, after getting it home and doing some more digging, I confirmed it has the dual-clutch style automatic. I have a basic understanding of how the dual-clutch automatic works but it is, to be honest, a bit out of my wheelhouse and comfort zone. To make matters worse, I can't seem to find much info on diagnosis, parts, repair, rebuild, etc.

Originally my plan was to pull the trans, have it rebuilt, reinstall, and drive (or sell) the vehicle. However, based on the little information I can find, it sounds like the internals are not as prone to breakage and I am probably looking at one of the other related components. Seems like the most likely suspects are the dual clutch pack or the 'controller' (to be honest, not sure what exactly it's called but I am talking about the part that actuates between the clutches). However, I can't find much on how to diagnose those issues anywhere.

Here are the symptoms I am seeing (still digging in so may add more as I find them):

1. Whining noise that seems to increase speed and/or volume with engine RPM. Also seems to be worse when first starting but that could be due to higher-RPM on cold start. Seems to be coming from front driver side of engine.
2. Trans engagement is best described as 'lazy' at best. I can get it to move but it takes a fair amount of RPM, feels sluggish once it does engage, and doesn't handle much resistance (wouldn't climb the ramps onto my car hauler without help from a winch). Seems to be about the same in forward and reverse gears with reverse maybe being marginally better. Have not tried moving it too much yet to confirm and also haven't tried driving at any speed yet, not sure if I should or not to avoid further damage.
3. Seems to randomly disengage and reengage while in motion, just sort of jerks you around sometimes. I noticed this in reverse, haven't had a chance to check if it does the same in forward gear. Seems to improve after warm-up but also haven't really tested this much yet.
4. Idles higher in drive than it does in any other shifter position.
5. No OBD codes that seem to be related to the trans.

Any ideas or insight on what the issue might be or what I can do to further narrow down the issue?

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

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You may need a better scanner that can access the TCM. Post the code numbers. Contact @DartGuyOH, he has actually fixed several DDCTs.
At 113k miles, your timing belt should have been replaced.
The 1.4turbo/DDCT is the least reliable powertrain for a Dart and is the reason the Dart you bought was so cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You may need a better scanner that can access the TCM. Post the code numbers. Contact @DartGuyOH, he has actually fixed several DDCTs.
At 113k miles, your timing belt should have been replaced.
The 1.4turbo/DDCT is the least reliable powertrain for a Dart and is the reason the Dart you bought was so cheap.
Thanks for the feedback. Any recommendations on a good scanner? Right now I have a BlueDrive scanner that should read body codes, TCM codes, etc. Codes I got are here: My BlueDriver Scan Result Report.pdf

Will reach out to DartGuyOH too!
 

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P062F is an internal TCM failure. But there may be more causing the whine and other symptoms. Replacing the TCM is probably a dealer procedure since a new TCM has to be flashed.
The misfire is probably caused by the ignition coils on each spark plug.
The AGS code is very common. Look at the AGS connector and wiring. The Dart sits so low that if you pull up to a parking curb, the connector gets damaged because it's just above the close out panel under the bumper cover.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
P062F is an internal TCM failure. But there may be more causing the whine and other symptoms. Replacing the TCM is probably a dealer procedure since a new TCM has to be flashed.
The misfire is probably caused by the ignition coils on each spark plug.
The AGS code is very common. Look at the AGS connector and wiring. The Dart sits so low that if you pull up to a parking curb, the connector gets damaged because it's just above the close out panel under the bumper cover.
Having mostly dealt with older vehicles without computers, this may be a dumb question but is it possible that the P062F code could have something to do with the fact that it has a brand new battery that the PO had installed when the old battery had run dead just before I bought the car?
 

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That isn't a common code. It will give you a service transmission message. Clear the code and see if it returns.
 

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Go get an OBDLinkmx+ or check the compatible device list on Alfaobd. You’ll want Alfaobd as your scantool app if you’re gonna be messing with the trans. If you have a TCM code that would explain a lot and you’ll need to get with mopar on that as there was a tcm and bracket recall because the OG bracket would allow the wire connections to the board of the tcm to break causing damage. You can check your VIN for recalls, they may say it’s been done but if you’d like to check it’s on the pass side floorboard under the carpet where your feet would be. If the bracket doesn’t look like the new recall work bracket check the p/n as mopar says a lot of things, but sometimes the dealers lie. As for the whining, I’d check the actual gearbox oil on the drivers side of the trans and just make sure there’s some in there if you pull the rubber plug. Past that I’d look into the condition of the fluid in the hydraulic actuator side of the trans. If it’s black as my soul it’s cooked and won’t work right, follow the directions and p/n’s on my FB page.

 

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If you still get the whining after all that then I would say either the internal even gear actuator (one pc. slave cyl. And bearing assembly) is on its way out. Or the Odd gear clutch bearing on the rod is bad. If you add my group and pm me on FB I’ll send you all the links for manuals, videos, etc. as I’ve got them in messenger to other people already and can copy and paste them right to ya
 

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Look for grease on top of (by inspection port you’ll be able to stick your finger in and feel for grease), under, and around the trans as that’ll tell you if the bearing is going out as well. It’s not a wet clutch so there’s no fluid inside the bell housing, if it’s wet there’s most likely an issue
 

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For the two B codes, check if the headlight bulbs are LED. The BCM does not like LED headlight bulbs.
28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Body Control (BCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

B162A-18-LEFT LOW BEAM CONTROL - UNDER CURRENT
Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Technical drawing

Theory of Operation

The Body Control Module (BCM) receives the input from the headlamp switch requesting low beam lamp illumination. The BCM provides a pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage output through the low beam driver circuit, which connects to the Low Beam Lamp. A common ground circuit is used for the Low and High Beam Lamps. For additional information on the Headlamp operation, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8L - Lamps and Lighting/Lamps/Lighting - Exterior - Operation) .

•When Monitored:
With the low beam headlamps active.

•Set Condition:
When the Body Control Module (BCM) detects a high condition on the (L43) Left Low Beam Driver circuit.

Possible Causes

(L43) LEFT LOW BEAM DRIVER CIRCUIT OPEN
(L43) LEFT LOW BEAM DRIVER CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
(Z905) GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN
LEFT LOW BEAM BULB
BODY CONTROL MODULE (BCM)



28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Body Control (BCM) / Diagnosis and Testing

B162E-18-RIGHT LOW BEAM CONTROL - UNDER CURRENT

Theory of Operation

The Body Control Module (BCM) receives the input from the headlamp switch requesting low beam lamp illumination. The BCM provides a pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage output through the low beam driver circuit, which connects to the Low Beam Lamp. A common ground circuit is used for the Low and High Beam Lamps. For additional information on the Headlamp operation, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8L - Lamps and Lighting/Lamps/Lighting - Exterior - Operation) .

•When Monitored:
With the low beam headlamps active.

•Set Condition:
When the Body Control Module (BCM) detects a high condition on the (L44) Right Low Beam Driver circuit.

Possible Causes

(L44) RIGHT LOW BEAM DRIVER CIRCUIT OPEN
(L44) RIGHT LOW BEAM DRIVER CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
(Z906) GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN
RIGHT LOW BEAM BULB
BODY CONTROL MODULE (BCM)
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Threw some regular halogen bulbs in the headlights (PO had swapped in LEDs) and took care of the B codes and dash warning. Found a broken wire on the AGS pigtail, wasn't enough wire left on the pigtail to fix so grabbed a "new" plug/pigtail from the JY to fix the AGS code.

Now just need to get it in the garage so I can get it in the air and start looking over the trans. I took it for a test drive around the block and it actually seems to drive ok overall other than the noise and sluggish feel (noise does go away occasionally, leads me to think clutch/bearing/actuator). More to come as I dig in I'm sure.
 
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