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Discussion Starter #1
8/13/15 update:
So i have had the rears sitting around waiting to get a sway bar to install them and i found they were very bound up, even after rebuilding them with the napa syl silicone, after letting them set for a while. I just took one of them apart and put anti seize in it and going to let it set for a bit to see if it stays pliable. I also noticed that even though i packed quite a bit in the end link, when i was cleaning it out there was alot that looked like it wasn't touched.


EDITORS NOTE: smaller pictures can be found on the discussion page here:
http://www.dodge-dart.org/forum/showwiki.php?title=Suspension:Complete+Bwoody+End+Links+Rebuild&p=406402&viewfull=1#post406402


So you been following our thread about the Bwoody endlinks 'drying' out and stiff?
http://www.dodge-dart.org/forum/dodge-dart-suspension-chassis/26739-possible-sway-end-link-blow-out-shocks.html


Intro and thoughts

Well after a member called the mfg and they gave vague descriptions and used the word "Pry Bar" i felt that's not going to work. so i did some detective work. The end link 'bushing' is a solid 1 piece press fit into the endlink design made of some sort or plastic/rubber compound. The threaded link part is a ball socket design and does just "pop" right into the end link. Im not so sure that this design is better or worse then others but compared to say a Moog, where the entire unit is pressed together and not "rebuild-able" im not sure what the pros and cons are. I also after further though think that a dust cover for the socket would be a nice touch and may go down the parts store and see if i can find a generic one to fit. Now without further wait lets get to the instructions.

Procedure

Tools needed
Rags, vice grips, 3 inch or bigger C clamp.


Step 1
Find yourself vice grip pliers and attach them like so to the ball joint:
2015-07-22 16.17.22.jpg

Pry/pull toward the endlink body tube, the ball socket will pop out of the joint with modest effort, if you do not pry towards the tube of the endlink the bushing flexes and holds on to the joint.

Step 2

When completed you will have this:
2015-07-22 16.09.21.jpg

You will want to clean out the cavity and the ball joint.

Now as you can see its not covered in very much copper anti seize at all, on the part or in the cavity. Mine were dried out and hard to move by hand. The following picture show how little there was in it. and that was the towel that had the most, the other side had a lot less!
2015-07-22 16.11.11.jpg
2015-07-22 16.19.01.jpg
Yes that is as much as i cleaned out of the one side it was that sparse and dry!!

Step 3

Now that you have the links cleaned you want to get to the heart of the wiki and that is to grease them sons a bitches! This is what i used, as you can see the properties its safe for rubber and has a wide range of heat and is not very fluid like, it stays in place.
2015-07-22 16.20.07.jpg
2015-07-22 16.19.56.jpg

I placed an amount a little bigger then the size of the nut that comes with these in the socket hole and spread a light coating on the ball part but left most of the grease in the pocket.

Step 4/[SIZE]

Attach your c-clamp and place the ball joint like so to press it back into the socket. The vendor recommends a mallet but i don't roll like that, i don't beat on parts unless im trashing them.
2015-07-22 16.24.02.jpg

Tighten the clamp untill you hear a small pop and squish of the grease getting displaced. You should have used enough for the end result to look like this, notice the ring of grease around the outside that got displaced.
2015-07-22 16.26.27.jpg

Step 5

Repeat for other links!

Closing and thoughts

I was able to see the copper anti seize in mine when i got them so i though they were lubed well, turns out that i was wrong, there was barely enough in there to cover the part as it is , as you can see maybe 1/4 of the grease if that i put in the cavity came out when the ball socket was reinserted so i say job complete they are well lubed now. I decided to use the silicone grease i had instead of heavy axle grease because i do not know the chemical makeup of the socket cavity and wanted to use something that was safe for rubber compounds. The most difficult part was pressing the ball joint back in keeping everything lined up so that pressure was being applied straight down into the socket. I hope this helps you and it should be done before installing! Never take a mfg word on rebuild-able products that they are properly lubed.

If you have any questions please post them in the discussion.
 

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now with smaller pics.

So you been following our thread about the Bwoody endlinks 'drying' out and stiff?
http://www.dodge-dart.org/forum/dodge-dart-suspension-chassis/26739-possible-sway-end-link-blow-out-shocks.html


Intro and thoughts

Well after a member called the mfg and they gave vague descriptions and used the word "Pry Bar" i felt that's not going to work. so i did some detective work. The end link 'bushing' is a solid 1 piece press fit into the endlink design made of some sort or plastic/rubber compound. The threaded link part is a ball socket design and does just "pop" right into the end link. Im not so sure that this design is better or worse then others but compared to say a Moog, where the entire unit is pressed together and not "rebuild-able" im not sure what the pros and cons are. I also after further though think that a dust cover for the socket would be a nice touch and may go down the parts store and see if i can find a generic one to fit. Now without further wait lets get to the instructions.

Procedure

Tools needed
Rags, vice grips, 3 inch or bigger C clamp.


Step 1
Find yourself vice grip pliers and attach them like so to the ball joint:
53189-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.17.22.jpg

Pry/pull toward the endlink body tube, the ball socket will pop out of the joint with modest effort, if you do not pry towards the tube of the endlink the bushing flexes and holds on to the joint.

Step 2

When completed you will have this:
53190d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.09.21.jpg

You will want to clean out the cavity and the ball joint.

Now as you can see its not covered in very much copper anti seize at all, on the part or in the cavity. Mine were dried out and hard to move by hand. The following picture show how little there was in it. and that was the towel that had the most, the other side had a lot less!
53191d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.11.11.jpg
53192d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.19.01.jpg
Yes that is as much as i cleaned out of the one side it was that sparse and dry!!

Step 3

Now that you have the links cleaned you want to get to the heart of the wiki and that is to grease them sons a bitches! This is what i used, as you can see the properties its safe for rubber and has a wide range of heat and is not very fluid like, it stays in place.
53193d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.20.07.jpg
53194d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.19.56.jpg

I placed an amount a little bigger then the size of the nut that comes with these in the socket hole and spread a light coating on the ball part but left most of the grease in the pocket.

Step 4

Attach your c-clamp and place the ball joint like so to press it back into the socket. The vendor recommends a mallet but i don't roll like that, i don't beat on parts unless im trashing them.
53195d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.24.02.jpg

Tighten the clamp untill you hear a small pop and squish of the grease getting displaced. You should have used enough for the end result to look like this, notice the ring of grease around the outside that got displaced.
53196d1437651298-complete-bwoody-end-links-rebuild-2015-07-22-16.26.27.jpg

Step 5

Repeat for other links!

Closing and thoughts

I was able to see the copper anti seize in mine when i got them so i though they were lubed well, turns out that i was wrong, there was barely enough in there to cover the part as it is , as you can see maybe 1/4 of the grease if that i put in the cavity came out when the ball socket was reinserted so i say job complete they are well lubed now. I decided to use the silicone grease i had instead of heavy axle grease because i do not know the chemical makeup of the socket cavity and wanted to use something that was safe for rubber compounds. The most difficult part was pressing the ball joint back in keeping everything lined up so that pressure was being applied straight down into the socket. I hope this helps you and it should be done before installing! Never take a mfg word on rebuild-able products that they are properly lubed.

If you have any questions please post them in the discussion.
 

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I still cannot give you any more rep as I have to spread some around first. The problem with that is it's hard trying to find people deserving of rep around here :)

You would think with how expensive this part is, they would properly lube this up for their customers...
 

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I still cannot give you any more rep as I have to spread some around first. The problem with that is it's hard trying to find people deserving of rep around here :)

You would think with how expensive this part is, they would properly lube this up for their customers...
Its ok @starscream5000 i got him rep for ya!
 

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Nice write up. Those bushings are polyurethane. So good call on the product you used to lube them. Stay away from any petroleum based lubricants, as they will eat away at the bushings causing premature failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks. I wanted to make sure to use a polyurethane friendly grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@hehateme2812

We have not determined what part to use to replace the polyurethane bushing from energy suspension. As to how to replace it, a bushing removal tool should be able to press the old one out and press a new one in.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
is there a reason you got replacements? did you have issues or wear a set out already?
 

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So just a note from my experience doing this yesterday. I did not have a c clamp to pop the ball/stud back into the bushing. I used the hammer method that Bwoody proved in a video on the other thread. Anyways if I packed pretty much the whole socket full of grease I could not get the ball/stud to go back in no matter what. Because the ball was making an airtight seal and not letting any grease come out. I had to stick my finger in all the way to make a "pocket" in the grease and then they would pop right back in.

ALSO, I would move them all around once they were installed and a few times they popped right out with little effort at all, it seemed as if the grease wasn't allowing it to seat all the way or there was pressure behind it making it pop out very easily.

And mine actually had a decent amount of anti-seize in them, but it was all in the very back of the socket and didn't actually provide lubrication. They were very hard to move before I greased them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Funny you say that. i just was looking at my rear ones that im getting ready to install with a rear sway bar and because it was making an air tight seal i think it was acting as a squeegee effect on the sides. I had a hell of a time getting them to move after i rebuilt them. So i took them apart, cleaned them out and used copper anti seize in them. Smooth as butter, smoother then with the silicone in them. Im going to let them set a week and see how they feel but im posting my findings as we speak to the front page.

Yes it seems you cant pack it full of lubricant no matter what you use because it is such a tight fit.


**Edit***
updated first page with findings.
 

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I used my vice to put them back in and it squeezed out around half the grease I put in them so I just reused it for the other bushings. They've been back on my car for a week and have held up so far. If they make it past the two week mark before they stop moving I'll consider it a victory haha
 

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Funny you say that. i just was looking at my rear ones that im getting ready to install with a rear sway bar and because it was making an air tight seal i think it was acting as a squeegee effect on the sides. I had a hell of a time getting them to move after i rebuilt them. So i took them apart, cleaned them out and used copper anti seize in them. Smooth as butter, smoother then with the silicone in them. Im going to let them set a week and see how they feel but im posting my findings as we speak to the front page.

Yes it seems you cant pack it full of lubricant no matter what you use because it is such a tight fit.


**Edit***
updated first page with findings.
I actually had the bottom of my front right one pop off when I was driving, so I took more grease out and popped it back in and it seems tighter now, I'll see how this holds up, it's like these things need a needle sized hole in the back to keep from holding pressure. If it continues to happen I'm gonna try to get my money back.

As for them locking up, mine I could all move by hand on the car, I can twist the link and it rotates on the ends.
 
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