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On my way to pick up my car. They said all it needed was a re-bleeding to get air out of the system. Apparently the first dealer didn’t do this very well. Fingers crossed.

I’ve got a 25 mile highway trip to make tomorrow for work, so I’ll probably be able to tell if it’s fixed for real (and for now) after that.
 

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Got it back. Clutch feels fine around town, still feels dead and squishy the first time I touch it when exiting the highway after 15-20 miles of not shifting. So basically the same as before. I’ve trained myself today to pop it in neutral while I’m braking and pump the clutch 3 times before I put it back in gear to try to get back up to speed, otherwise that first shift and clutch engagement result in a moment of slippage as the clutch engages slower than normal.

Back to the dealer for try #3?
 

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I literally just installed the Deyeme Racing CLutch delay valve. I can’t believe I waited 2 years to install. Takes 2 people and less than an hour. Had my master slave cylinder replaced after pedal got stuck to the floor a year ago.

Sounds like more air in the system, leaking CDV, or a bad master slave cylinder. Could try bleeding the lines at home, not difficult but requires two people, extra brake fluid, getting a little dirty, and likely a sore thumb for the retaining clip

Look on the instructions on the Deyeme website for the dart CDV delete for more details.
 

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Got it back. Clutch feels fine around town, still feels dead and squishy the first time I touch it when exiting the highway after 15-20 miles of not shifting. So basically the same as before. I’ve trained myself today to pop it in neutral while I’m braking and pump the clutch 3 times before I put it back in gear to try to get back up to speed, otherwise that first shift and clutch engagement result in a moment of slippage as the clutch engages slower than normal.

Back to the dealer for try #3?
My Dart is a '14 with 55k miles. I bought it in July with 44k, and have put 11k on it in 4 months. It's been a good reliable car except for this one issue. The clutch pedal would sometimes stick to the floor when pressed, usually first thing in the morning when the car was cold. It would happen one day in five, maybe. (It never fell to the floor by itself, which I think is a whole different problem.) Anyway, one of the veterans on here posted the link to the service bulletin for my problem, which said you have to replace the clutch master cylinder. This past weekend, armed with the '14 Dart service manual on a CD, and a brand new master cylinder (Made in Italy), I swapped out the CMC.

I have to say it was a pain to reach the 13 mm nuts holding the CMC to the firewall. In fact, I held off disconnecting the fluid lines until I could verify I could actually get a wrench on both 13 mm nuts. It turns out they are slightly easier to reach when the lines are disconnected. Bleeding the clutch circuit took a couple tries to get right. At least the bleed port is readily accessible on the front of the transmission. I couldn't find clear 1/4 inch tubing, so I used 5/16 tubing but connected by a vacuum tee to a short piece of 1/4" fuel line that went onto the bleed port. I routed the line up over the battery so I could see a vertical column of fluid coming out of the bleed port. You have to push the clip on the line connector, then the manual says pull the connector out 3 mm to open the bleed port. It sounded like the connector had a stop at the 3 mm place, but in practice mine didn't work that way. I ended up pushing down the clip, then having my son push the clutch pedal. The connector would pop out, and I had to hold it carefully to make sure it didn't come all the way out. But when I did it right, I did get a sizeable column of fluid to come up out of the bleed port on each stroke. Then re-seat the connector, release clip, and then let the clutch pedal back up. After doing it a bunch of times, I got it to be pretty repeatable. Had to wear tough leather gloves to push down that clip, it would kill your thumb otherwise.

So I got the system bled and the car back on the road. The clutch pedal was a lot firmer than it was with the old CMC. No tendency at all to stay pushed down, even on a cold morning.

Unfortunately, now the clutch itself is slipping. This started immediately with the new CMC, but was hard to notice at first. The first drive was about 7 miles, and we had a slight burning clutch odor when we parked, which I put down at first to spilled fluid burning off. Clutch slipping was not really noticeable from driving and shifting, but the burned clutch odor persisted after each short drive. Finally, this morning, the slipping got bad enough to really feel it while driving, so the car is back home and out of service at the moment. Now I have to decide whether to tackle clutch replacement on my own, or pony up 2 grand to have a dealer do it for me.

It seems like I read about someone on here saying they had a dealer replace their CMC, then the dealer said soon after, now you have to replace the whole clutch. I am trying to figure out how replacing the CMC can trigger clutch slipping. On my car, looking back to a couple months ago, I would notice symptoms of the old CMC not pushing he clutch all the way. The pedal staying on the floor was one symptom, but I also noticed a few times I would push the clutch pedal down to start the car and feel the car move slightly when I turned the starter (in gear). It was as though the clutch was not getting enough hydraulic pressure to release fully. This was subtle, but I can remember it now looking back. Anyway, whether my CMC had an air bubble or internal leakage, it seems it wasn't getting full pressure to the slave cylinder. Now with a new CMC developing full pressure, perhaps it has directly caused a failure in the slave cylinder. I have no evidence of fluid leakage. The reservoir is just as full as I left it after finishing the CMC job.

I'm just writing my experience here for the benefit of other owners who go through something similar. I'll try to post again when I figure out what I'm going to do next.

I am thinking if I do replace the clutch myself, I should probably stick with stock hardware. New flywheel, since mine could be heat damaged by now. Just kind of hoping that with all new parts the system will function as designed. I looked at the old CMC and it was pretty loose internally. I would not be surprised at all if it had intermal leakage. Anyway, it's a shame only to get 55k miles out of a clutch. I have no idea how my car was treated for the first 44k miles. I am not sure about getting 100k miles out of a clutch like some on here say, but I'd settle for 75-80k miles like a good set of brakes.
 

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Got my car back yesterday for the third time. They replaced the master cylinder again ( first dealer already did this a month ago). They were sure that new one was defective. They were sure that another CMC would fix the problem.

An 80 mile drive for work this morning confirmed that this was not the problem. Drove in 6th gear the whole way. When I got off, first touch of the clutch pedal resulted in it only coming back up about an inch or two. Snapped a crappy fuzzy picture of it while I coasted up the ramp in neutral.

Heading back for round 4 at 8 am tomorrow. :mad:
 

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I was talking with a coworker today about his 15' 2.4 dart, and he mentioned the pedal sticking issue. Apparently there is a newer master cylinder that's out that doesn't have this problem? Is there like a newer version?
 

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I was talking with a coworker today about his 15' 2.4 dart, and he mentioned the pedal sticking issue. Apparently there is a newer master cylinder that's out that doesn't have this problem? Is there like a newer version?
I sure hope so. I have been getting paranoid reading all these posts about it. Maybe I'm just worrying myself over something that may not happen to me but I would rather know ahead of time.. I am certain SOMEONE aftermarket will come up with a better version eventually.. If I could aftermarket the entire clutch system I would at this point.
 

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I decided to go for the clutch change out on my own. I did that more than once on my old F-100 pickup, but never have had the pleasure on a small car. Got the car up on blocks, printed out the service manual pages, and started disassembly over the weekend. I came up short on some tools that apparently do not exist anywhere in my city. The transmission has a drain plug that needs a 12 mm Allen wrench, and of course the front axle nuts are 36 mm and I didn't have that. Special ordered these tools from NAPA. I did order the clutch hose with no restrictor and the rear engine isolator mount from Deyeme Racing. Have to shout out for Deyeme, it seems like they got it to my house the next day, and I have no idea how they did that so fast. Not only that, they made the isolator mount bright orange to match my car, and that wasn't even in their list of colors. Over the weekend I ordered the FX100 clutch, an OEM spec flywheel, and a slave cylinder from Modern Performance. Also the axle nuts. I had Carquest swear to me that not only would they not sell the axle nuts separately (without a whole CV assy), but nobody in the city would have them. I gave up after looking at 3 stores. This surprises me, but now I know why there are at least 3 staking marks on the axle nut currently on my car. A lot of the wheel bolts were also mangled by apes with air wrenches, so I replaced about 11 bad ones. Now the 3/4 socket goes on smoothly for all 20.
 

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The Dart front axle nut is 6509898AA M24 x 1.5. You could try to source that using the thread size/pitch and maybe even get the nylock version so you never have to worry about staking. Just for fun, I have tried removing staked front axle nuts at the junkyard. I found the easiest way was to use a chisel to make cuts on each side of the the stake and then a small punch breaks out the rest. The nut could be reused by swapping sides and if after torquing to 148 ft lbs you end up with the nut clocked to a new position. Here is a nut with the cuts cleaned up with a dremel and ready to be reused:
fronthubnut.jpg
 
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The Dart front axle nut is 6509898AA M24 x 1.5. You could try to source that using the thread size/pitch and maybe even get the nylock version so you never have to worry about staking. Just for fun, I have tried removing staked front axle nuts at the junkyard. I found the easiest way was to use a chisel to make cuts on each side of the the stake and then a small punch breaks out the rest. The nut could be reused by swapping sides and if after torquing to 148 ft lbs you end up with the nut clocked to a new position. Here is a nut with the cuts cleaned up with a dremel and ready to be reused:
I don't mind buying the new nuts. MP had them for like $3 apiece. That's chickenfeed compared to the cost of the clutch parts. I haven't tried to unstake the old nuts yet, but I was expecting to have to chisel them. I did this on my wife's old Mercury Tracer many years ago, so I must have found some way to do it. That car needed 300 ft-lbf to break the torque on the old nuts. I sheared two half inch drives, which I never did in my life, and that car is why I now own a 3/4 inch drive breaker bar.

One thing funny about the Dart service manual, though. They say, "the staking must be in the opposite direction from the forward rotation of the wheel." Then there is a picture showing a right handed staking, and left handed staking is shown crossed out. But the text only makes sense if the left axle had a left hand thread. As far as I can tell, there is only one part number for axle nuts and they are all right handed. I think I am going to ignore what the manual says and just stake both sides to prevent the nut from loosening, regardless of which way the wheel rotates. Maybe I will also inspect those threads for handedness, just in case, before I get out that breaker bar.
 

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The hub nuts are "lefty loosey" "righty tighty". As far as I know all the Dart fasteners are.
You are referring to this:

dartfronthub5.jpg

Yes, it's confusing. Any stake plus 148 ft lbs torque will keep the nut from loosening. In my opinion, even a Nylock nut would do that and that's what I plan to use when I have to remove the stock hub nuts. The stakes I removed at the junkyard were so close to the axle that a 1/16 punch would not fit. Chisel was the only way. It made me miss the old cotter pin method.
 

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Yes, it's confusing. Any stake plus 148 ft lbs torque will keep the nut from loosening. In my opinion, even a Nylock nut would do that and that's what I plan to use when I have to remove the stock hub nuts. The stakes I removed at the junkyard were so close to the axle that a 1/16 punch would not fit. Chisel was the only way. It made me miss the old cotter pin method.
I got the axles out this week. Unstaking the axle nuts took a little effort. The steel used in the nut flange is thick enough that it's not trivial to unstake. Even the service manual says you have to hammer on it with a punch or something. I used my smallest cold chisel and cut straight into the nut on both sides of the groove in the axle shaft, then I was able to insert a hardened center punch and force the stake up and out of the groove. On my Dart, one side was staked with the Mopar staking tool 10287, and the other side was staked by apes with sharp objects. The ape side took two rounds of unstaking and over 200 ft-lb to break the torque. Wifey had to stomp the brakes extra hard for that one! The properly staked side was easier to lift and took maybe 140-ish ft-lb to break torque. I am seriously considering shelling out for the 10287 tool, especially if I have to do this every 50,000 miles because stupid Fiat clutch.

Also got the exhaust off without difficulty, which seemed miraculous given the horror stories I read on here about the exhaust nuts at the catalytic converter. I just used WD-40 and a little patience. I usually use Permatex anti-seize putting things back together and that always pays great dividends on the next teardown.

Separating the ball joint was also a pain. The manual says use a pry bar, but that is for people with a perfect pry bar working 5 feet in the air. I had a crow bar and worked 18 inches off the ground, and all it did was gouge the aluminum control arm. I didn't get any joy until I found my old pickle fork and started hammering. You have move the knuckle an inch and a half or more to get it out. I ended up sticking large open end wrenches in to fill the gap, and kept on with the pickle fork. Of course, the ball joint rubber boot was totally trashed on the first one where I tried the pry bar first. The second one came out more or less intact. It looks like you can't replace the ball joint rubber boot without replacing the whole control arm for a hundred bucks.

I am off to buy a transmission jack tonight. One question though, for anyone who pulled their transmission. The Dart service manual says you are supposed to remove the passenger side cradle extension beam as the last step before dropping the transmission. I can understand pulling the driver side beam, since it is in the way of the tranny. But why the passenger side beam? Can this step be omitted?
 

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The transmission jack that I use is from Harbor Freight. I have had it for at least 15 years, not sure if they still sell it. It has a strap which helps.
transjack.jpg

The lower control arm ball joint stud is indeed a pain. When I was playing with this at the junkyard, I hammered down on the control arm, used my breaker bar with a cheater pipe in the frame slot, and used a large screwdriver to open the slot some where the cinch bolt clamps the stud. I just about destroyed the lower control arms. I did get the struts and axles with less than 30k miles though.
Not sure about the cradle extension beams, I did not pull the trans. It was damaged.
 
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The transmission jack that I use is from Harbor Freight. I have had it for at least 15 years, not sure if they still sell it. It has a strap which helps.

The lower control arm ball joint stud is indeed a pain. When I was playing with this at the junkyard, I hammered down on the control arm, used my breaker bar with a cheater pipe in the frame slot, and used a large screwdriver to open the slot some where the cinch bolt clamps the stud. I just about destroyed the lower control arms. I did get the struts and axles with less than 30k miles though.
Not sure about the cradle extension beams, I did not pull the trans. It was damaged.
Wow, I can totally see wrecking the control arms getting the knuckles separated. They are only aluminum. I did not think to pry apart the pinch bolt joint, but that might have taken extra hands.

I finally got my transmission out over the past weekend. It was a big job. I am 18 hours into the clutch job overall, and 5 hours of that was just separating the transmission and getting it out of the car. For starters, I did not know the weight of the transmission, so I had to treat it gingerly like it weighed 400 pounds. It doesn't; in fact, I can lift it. I would guess it weighs just under 150 pounds. The clearance to the frame and cradle is very tight, though. I also got the Harbor Freight transmission jack, but the next model up with 800 pound lift, two-axis adjust, and a chain. Well, my first mistake was that the jack has four clamps, and the left rear one ended up blocking the transmission from moving all the way left to the frame rail. Had to be clever to get that out of the way while the transmisson was already loose. Then I had a tough time figuring out the geometric path the transmission had to follow to get out of the engine compartment. I drew some sketches, and we'll see if that helps when I go to put it back in. The spline shaft ended up hitting the pressure plate and blocking progress for a while. The safety chain on the jack stand was useless, because I had to rotate the transmission quite a bit just to get it out. You gradually pull the left side down and forward to clear the cradle, while the back of the bellhousing (and/or spline shaft) are hung up on the pressure plate. When I finally got near the end, the transmission jack was bottomed out, the transmission was tilted about 45 degrees left, and it was still hung up on the cradle with the bellhousing hung up on the pressure plate. I swapped to a floor jack, lifted up a bit, then jockeyed the transmission by leaning over the front of the car, lifting and rotating, while my son released the floor jack the last few inches to ground and I held the transmission from tipping. At that point, the spline shaft was pointing straight up. Then we rolled the transmission right out and it just cleared the bumper.

My lessons learned from all this: the transmission is light enough that you can jockey it around by hand a little bit, provided it is loose enough to move, and not hung up on anything. Go a little bit at a time. There are enough places to grab for leverage, but watch out for the reverse sensor fitting, which is plastic. The cradle and pressure plate provide enough interference that it would be hard for the transmission to fall out as you are trying to lower it. This was a big fear on my part (also still thinking the transmission was much much heavier), but in retrospect wasn't much of a risk. So I never used the safety strap, and I don't think it would have been practical. Remember, I was working on the floor and when I finally got the transmission clear of the pressure plate, it only had about 4-6 inches left to go down. If I was working on a lift up in the air, then I think the safety strap or chain would be really important.

I did answer my own question about the cradle extension beam on the passenger side. It turns out you are leaving the entire engine suspended from the passenger side mount, which has some give to it. When the engine comes down, the air conditioner pulley will contact the cradle extension beam. Taking the beam out involves three bolts in the front, and four on the cradle, all with welded nuts. It wasn't a huge deal to take it out. I also found that the engine couldn't be supported from the block, or there was no room for the transmission jack. I ended up supporting the oil pan with a jackstand and some wood blocks. I have seen removed engines just resting on the oil pan, so figured it was worth a try. Sure enough, the oil pan didn't get dented. Got to keep an eye on that jackstand, though, since the engine can move around quite a bit.

Now I need to get some photos and measurements of the dead clutch disk so I can try to figure out why it was slipping. There was no evidence of fluid leakage from the clutch master cylinder. I am still waiting for my Modern Performance clutch order, but at least they have shipped it now. First the flywheel was on back order, but they got that. Now they say the Clutch Masters clutch is on back order and will ship directly from Clutch Masters. No tracking number as yet.
 

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Still plugging away on my clutch replacement project. I am now 31 hours into it, but got the transmission back into the car yesterday. I ended up just using my 2 ton roller floor jack this time, since the transmission jack had too high a starting height. Separating the transmission took me 5 hours, but getting it back in I did under 2 hours, thanks to knowing what to do this time. I started the transmission upright, not on its side the way it ended up coming out. I had one false start with the transmission trying to slide off the jack, but the second try was better aligned and it worked. What I learned was, the best way to get into position is to raise up the transmission and guide into place upright until the back edge of the bellhousing binds up on the clutch plate, and the output shaft housing is wedged into the cradle. Then the magic step -- rotate the transmission output shaft housing upwards several inches until the output housing driver side edge actually clears the cradle, then you will be able to get the bellhousing over the clutch assembly without even scraping it. The height of the transmission at that point should be just low enough that the top of the driver side is just below the unibody frame rail, allowing the magic rotation move. Again, once you are between the cradle and the clutch plate, the risk of the transmission slipping off the jack goes down. You can even boost the thing up from underneath with one hand to keep repositioning the jack head as needed. Wish I had known all that before starting, so good luck to anyone else reading this before doing the same job some day.

I could not find a torque anywhere in the manual for the three bolts holding the driver side motor mount spacer onto the transmission. The motor mount to spacer bolts were coarse thread and bigger diameter, and the manual said to use 77 ft-lb for them. So I settled on 50 ft-lb for the three fine thread bolts going from the spacer into the transmission itself. These have a torx head.

I found the 10 mm x 1.25 mm fine thread bolts holding the cradle extension beams on the front side were a little rusty, so I chased the threads on both bolt and nut with a tap and die, and added anti-seize on assembly. One bolt also had to be filed. There is not much rust on my Dart, so this item surprised me a bit. Maybe they don't treat those bolts at the factory.

Also found one of my upper bellhousing bolts was the wrong length, apparently straight from the factory. It was over length, and the head was just sticking out a quarter inch or so. This one is hard to get at or even see very well. I checked for mixed up bolts, but all the others were the correct length. In the end, I reused the overlength bolt, but added a stack of washers to let me torque it properly.

I also added my Deyeme clutch delay valve delete at this point.

For the shifter cables, they are clamped to the transmission on a top bracket, using round plastic retainer clips that fit in a circle between the cable assembly and the bracket. This plastic does not hold up to the engine environment, and both my clips came apart on removal. Just squeezing the tabs was enough to break them. I could not find replacement plastic clips anywhere for love or money. They are part of the $200 clutch cable assembly, and not sold separately, nor do any of the aftermarket guys have them. I noticed the bracket is generously sized, so I pulled it off the transmission and drilled a pair of holes beside each cable. Then I took a piece of quarter inch aluminum bar and cut out two c-shaped clamps to go over the top of the two cables on the back side of the bracket. I tapped holes in my clamps and found some 10-24 socket head cap screws to go with them. This is a hard area of the car to reach, wedged between the transmission and a bunch of engine hoses and harnesses. But my clamps worked well, and tool access to the screws was from the front, and there was room to get in with a hex bit. I also wedged in a portion of the original plastic clips as best I could to control the cable spacing. I took a picture and will try to post it next time.

Replacing the clutch slave cylinder, one mistake I made was in removing the circular plastic clip where the hydraulic line penetrates the bellhousing. This clip has four tabs in the back holding it to the bellhousing. You are probably supposed to squeeze them from inside the bellhousing to get them out. They are brittle and it was cold. So naturally, I snapped off all four on removal. So my passthough can now pop out a quarter inch or so. My plan is to safety wire it to the heater hose bracket to keep it from moving around. Pre-filling the clutch slave cylinder turned out to be a snap. Just pour some brake fluid in a dish, compress the CSC, and have it suck in the new fluid through the supply line. Then turn it upright and squeeze out the air. This was pretty easy actually.

Finally, I made some measurements. The transmission weighed in at 117 pounds, a bit lighter than my original guess. It is light enough you can jockey it around during removal and installation. As for the clutch itself, it had two composite disks riveted with a sheet spring in between. The individual disks were down to 0.115 to 0.120 after 55,000 miles. The worn assembly was hard to measure since it was flexible, but my best estimate was 0.280 thick when squeezed tight. The new FX-100 disk from Clutch Masters was a pretty stiff assembly and its total thickness was 0.325. So for Dart, it looks like 0.045 wear on the clutch was enough to cause slipping. There is an inspection panel at the bottom of the bellhousing, so you could try to measure from under the car, maybe with a mirror to see around the flywheel. When the clutch wears, there are two parallel surfaces on the clutch plate and flywheel that line up. I suspect that is not a coincidence, and is intended as a clutch wear indication. With my new clutch, those surfaces are now separated by 0.045. I still don't understand how replacing the clutch master cylinder immediately caused slipping of an admittedly worn clutch, but there you go.
 

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I finished my clutch job on Christmas Eve. The total time I spent was 40 hours. I am guessing a pro shop would call this a two day job, so I am always something like 2-3 times slower. I ended up using the Mopar transmission fluid, which was quite spendy at $35 a quart. Shifter Cable Clamps.jpg Trying to insert a picture here of the shifter cable clamps I made.

The car did not want to start after 5 weeks in the garage. Took several minutes of cranking to get any action at all.

Driving felt like a completely different car. I had to learn the feel of it all over again. Mainly the clutch pedal engages now very close to full aft, whereas before you had to push it half way to the floor. I have a vibration I didn't have before, but that was not surprising considering I skipped the whole step about neutralizing the power train and adjusting the three motor mounts. Also the CDV delete and Deyeme motor mount give a different feel to driving. What concerned me more was that I smelled burning clutch a few times. Oh great, was this all for nothing? It seems to have gone away, so perhaps it was related to break-in of the new friction surfaces. I have only put 25 miles on the car so far, keeping close to home.
 

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I have a couple other relevant pictures. This first one is my answer to the $100 Mopar tool for holding the flywheel in place while you torque the bolts. Just hold the flywheel with a screwdriver and pull the torque wrench with the other hand.

View attachment 116046

Here is another shot of that, plus how I supported the engine. The oil pan on this car has such a weird and complicated shape, I honestly can't tell if I dented it or not.

Flywheel Tool.jpg

Finally I have to show the Deyeme rear motor mount isolator. They made it orange to match my car! Unfortunately, their part came 0.010 oversize compared to my original (I measured) and it would not go in the pocket. I had to file off the extra material. It was aluminum so this just took a bit of elbow grease.

Rear Motor Mount Fitting.jpg
 

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Well I have 1000 miles on my new clutch at this point and I am going to declare the operation a success. Just a few final comments for anyone else doing a DIY clutch job on their Dart. Break-in period lasted 20-40 miles and included some weird vibration and burning clutch smell as the friction surfaces wore from initial contact. Scary at first, but these complaints went away pretty soon. I skipped the powertrain relax step and just tried to put the motor mounts back where they were; looks like I got away with it. The feel of the new clutch is totally unlike the old, so be prepared for that. The point of engagement in clutch pedal travel is way different, but also for me the feel of the pedal is also different. I went from super weak and pedal sometimes not springing back (my original complaint), to super stiff using the new master cylinder on the old clutch with delay valve, to sort of in between feel that I have now with new master cylinder, new slave, new clutch, and CDV delete. That probably also had an effect on pedal feel. As for driveability, mine is greatly improved. Now I can go through all the gears smoothly if I try, and I struggled with that when I had the stock configuration with delay valve. The flywheel in this car is a two part with a spring, which gives the car a clunky feel if you don't shift perfectly (and I usually don't). My old Ford F-100 didn't have that, so I probably learned shifting all the wrong way.

As for the rear engine mount, hoo boy. What Deyeme doesn't tell you is that their mount has a huge chunk of fresh polyurethane or whatever, and it has a lengthy bake-out period. At first when the car got fully warmed up on the freeway, the smell of this was so strong I thought I had an engine fire. If you stop at a traffic light with the fan on, convection brings the fumes right up to the back of the hood and straight into the cabin air intake. 1000 miles later, I can still smell it from time to time, but it is starting to get faint. I'd say it's no reason not to get the Deyeme part, just be prepared for the smell for a while. Mine never smoked or anything like that, just very pungent for a while. I guess you could oven bake the part for a few days before install and get past that if it bothered you.

I keep hearing about folks who get a lot of miles out of a clutch, so it must be possible. I don't know how my car was treated for the first few years, but I am starting to think the previous owner maybe rode the clutch a bit. No signs of heat damage though. So given how hard it is to change a clutch and how relatively easy to do the brakes, I am going to change my driving style and avoid downshifting whenever possible. There's no mountain driving to worry about where I live anyway. I don't ride the clutch or double clutch or other bad habits that I know of, so I am just going to take it easy, inspect after 25000 miles or so, and see what the wear was. Good luck to anyone else doing a clutch job. Ping me if you want.
 

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Well I have 1000 miles on my new clutch at this point and I am going to declare the operation a success. Just a few final comments for anyone else doing a DIY clutch job on their Dart. Break-in period lasted 20-40 miles and included some weird vibration and burning clutch smell as the friction surfaces wore from initial contact. Scary at first, but these complaints went away pretty soon. I skipped the powertrain relax step and just tried to put the motor mounts back where they were; looks like I got away with it. The feel of the new clutch is totally unlike the old, so be prepared for that. The point of engagement in clutch pedal travel is way different, but also for me the feel of the pedal is also different. I went from super weak and pedal sometimes not springing back (my original complaint), to super stiff using the new master cylinder on the old clutch with delay valve, to sort of in between feel that I have now with new master cylinder, new slave, new clutch, and CDV delete. That probably also had an effect on pedal feel. As for driveability, mine is greatly improved. Now I can go through all the gears smoothly if I try, and I struggled with that when I had the stock configuration with delay valve. The flywheel in this car is a two part with a spring, which gives the car a clunky feel if you don't shift perfectly (and I usually don't). My old Ford F-100 didn't have that, so I probably learned shifting all the wrong way.

As for the rear engine mount, hoo boy. What Deyeme doesn't tell you is that their mount has a huge chunk of fresh polyurethane or whatever, and it has a lengthy bake-out period. At first when the car got fully warmed up on the freeway, the smell of this was so strong I thought I had an engine fire. If you stop at a traffic light with the fan on, convection brings the fumes right up to the back of the hood and straight into the cabin air intake. 1000 miles later, I can still smell it from time to time, but it is starting to get faint. I'd say it's no reason not to get the Deyeme part, just be prepared for the smell for a while. Mine never smoked or anything like that, just very pungent for a while. I guess you could oven bake the part for a few days before install and get past that if it bothered you.

I keep hearing about folks who get a lot of miles out of a clutch, so it must be possible. I don't know how my car was treated for the first few years, but I am starting to think the previous owner maybe rode the clutch a bit. No signs of heat damage though. So given how hard it is to change a clutch and how relatively easy to do the brakes, I am going to change my driving style and avoid downshifting whenever possible. There's no mountain driving to worry about where I live anyway. I don't ride the clutch or double clutch or other bad habits that I know of, so I am just going to take it easy, inspect after 25000 miles or so, and see what the wear was. Good luck to anyone else doing a clutch job. Ping me if you want.
Whats wrong with double clutching and how is it a bad habit? I find that the transmission shifts much smoother when doing so and you get less back and forth head throw in doing so. My understanding of double clutching means that you engage the clutch into neutral, let out and engage again from neutral into next gear. Is this not correct? Also I don't see anything wrong with downshifting as long as you match the rev, or rev match as they call it. Fyi I have almost 70,000 miles on my original clutch, I'm tuned and I have never had any slip whatsoever. Don't get it twisted I know how to baby a manual transaxle :haha:
 
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