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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Periodically I get a hard jar while heavily accelerating, usually when merging onto the highway or similar. Followed by limp shutting the car off and on limp is cleared and driving for a couple days clears the code. I've had it happen once 6 months ago and just recently twice. Is that sensor something that could be cleaned or should I replace or consider something else?

Thanks in advance.
 

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You need to scan for codes when it is in limp mode. There should at least be a pending code. Post any codes you are getting. Guessing should not be how you diagnose a problem. There are just too many possible things that could cause your symptoms. Are you checking oil level on the dipstick? 2.4 engines do consume oil. There is a free customer satisfaction campaign for a fix to reduce oil consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well originally ever scan came back nothing, A friend of a friend with a snap on scanner got a code that just said cam position sensor. But other then that I haven't found a scanner that even recognizes I have a code at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You need to scan for codes when it is in limp mode. There should at least be a pending code. Post any codes you are getting. Guessing should not be how you diagnose a problem. There are just too many possible things that could cause your symptoms. Are you checking oil level on the dipstick? 2.4 engines do consume oil. There is a free customer satisfaction campaign for a fix to reduce oil consumption.
Sorry I didn't reply to half of what you said. But oils good I was aware and watch that. Also you said check the code while it's in limp mode. I've always checked it after the fact.. I usually restart the car and get off the highway. But checking while it's still in limp will provide different results?
 

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Not every scanner will show pending codes or be able to access every module. Get a bluetooth scanner that you can carry with you like the OBDLink MX+. The alfaOBD android app will read every code from a Dart. Always get the code number not just the description. There are several codes that have the words camshaft sensor in the description.
P0016-CRANKSHAFT/CAMSHAFT TIMING MISALIGNMENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0340-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0344-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not every scanner will show pending codes or be able to access every module. Get a bluetooth scanner that you can carry with you like the OBDLink MX+. The alfaOBD android app will read every code from a Dart. Always get the code number not just the description. There are several codes that have the words camshaft sensor in the description.
P0016-CRANKSHAFT/CAMSHAFT TIMING MISALIGNMENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0340-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0344-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
Thank you I'm gonna grab that odb link and see what I can find out. I appreciate the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not every scanner will show pending codes or be able to access every module. Get a bluetooth scanner that you can carry with you like the OBDLink MX+. The alfaOBD android app will read every code from a Dart. Always get the code number not just the description. There are several codes that have the words camshaft sensor in the description.
P0016-CRANKSHAFT/CAMSHAFT TIMING MISALIGNMENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0340-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR CIRCUIT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
P0344-CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT - BANK 1 SENSOR 1
 

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Whenever you see the word intermittent in a code description, that means almost always a wiring or connector problem. Check the wiring using the diagnostic tree below before buying anything. If you are intimidated by electrical problems, take it somewhere. If you feel like buying the sensor anyway before checking the wiring, don't buy the sensor at a part store. Part store sensors are all made in China and will likely not work new from the box or fail very soon.

28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM), 2.4L / Diagnosis and Testing

P0339-CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT
Rectangle Parallel Font Diagram Composite material

Theory of Operation

The Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor circuits consist of a Powertrain Control Module (PCM) supplied 5-Volt reference circuit, low reference circuit and an output signal circuit. The CKP Sensor is an internally magnetic biased digital output integrated circuit sensing device. The sensor detects magnetic flux changes between the peaks and valleys of a tone wheel on the crankshaft. Each tooth on the tone wheel is evenly spaced with missing teeth used as a reference gap. The CKP Sensor produces an ON/OFF DC voltage of varying frequency, reference output pulses per crankshaft revolution. The frequency of the CKP Sensor output depends on the velocity of the crankshaft. The CKP Sensor sends a digital signal to the PCM , which represents an image of the crankshaft tone wheel. The PCM uses each CKP signal pulse to determine crankshaft speed and decodes the crankshaft tone wheel reference gap to identify crankshaft position. This information is then used to sequence the ignition timing and fuel injection events for the engine. The PCM also uses CKP Sensor output information to determine the crankshaft position relative to the camshaft. This information is used to identify cylinder misfires and to control the CMP actuator if equipped.

When Monitored and Set Conditions

When Monitored: This diagnostic runs continuously when the following conditions are met:

•With the engine cranking or running.

Set Conditions:

•The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects that Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP) Sensor Signal has been lost four times within eight crankshaft revolutions.

Default Actions:

•The MIL light will illuminate.

Possible Causes

5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)

Always perform the Pre-Diagnostic Troubleshooting procedure before proceeding. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

1.CHECK FOR APPLICABLE SERVICE BULLETIN

1. Check for any applicable Service Bulletins that may apply for this issue.

Were any Service Bulletins applicable?

Yes

•Perform the applicable Service Bulletin. Erase the DTC and perform the verification test.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 2



2.CHECK FOR AN ACTIVE DTC

NOTE: Diagnose and repair any 5-volt reference DTCs before continuing with this test procedure.

1. Turn the ignition on.

2. With the scan tool, read DTCs and record on the repair order.

3. Start the engine, or crank the engine for 10 seconds.

NOTE:
If the vehicle starts and runs, wiggle test the wiring and see if problem duplicates or the fault sets.

Is the DTC active or pending?

Yes

•Go To 5

No

•Go To 3



3.WIRE HARNESS/CKP SENSOR INSPECTION

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the harness connectors at the PCM and Crank Sensor and inspect for wire chaffing or rub conditions, terminals pushed out on the wiring connector, bent terminals at the PCM and Crank Sensor, water in the connector cavities, presence of corrosion on the terminals of the connectors or components.

3. Visually inspect the mounting area of Crank Sensor for debris/damage or a loose sensor. Remove the Crank Sensor and inspect the end of the sensor for signs of damage or debris. Rotate the engine and if possible, inspect the target wheel for any signs of damage. Reinstall the Crank Sensor and ensure that the sensor is properly installed and torqued to proper specification.

NOTE:
Due to the fact that this DTC is set by an intermittent loss of the signal, the most likely cause is a poor connection at the Crank Sensor or PCM terminals, or a poor signal between the Crank Sensor and target wheel. Because of this, unplugging and reconnecting the harness connectors, or repositioning the Crank Sensor will often repair the condition that set the DTC.

Were any problems found?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate repair.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 4



4.CHECK THE VEHICLE’S REPAIR HISTORY

1. Check the history of the vehicle for previous crank sensor related DTCs within the past 90 days.

Did the repair history show that the vehicle was in dealership for a crank sensor fault within the past 90 days?

Yes

•Replace the Crank Sensor in accordance with the Service Information. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Test complete. Reconnect the harness connectors, and erase the DTC. The most likely cause was a poor connection at one of the harness connectors. Verify the DTC does not return.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



5.CHECK THE (F855) 5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT VOLTAGE

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the CKP Sensor harness connector.

3. Turn the ignition on.

4. Measure the voltage on the (F855) 5-Volt Supply circuit at the CKP Sensor harness connector.

Is the voltage between 4.8 and 5.2 volts?

Yes

•Go To 6

No, voltage is below 4.8 volts:

•Repair the 5-Volt Supply circuit for an open or short to ground.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No, voltage is above 5.2 volts:

•Repair the 5-Volt Supply circuit for a short to voltage.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



6.CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT VOLTAGE

1. Measure the voltage on the (K24) CKP Signal circuit at the CKP Sensor harness connector.

Is the voltage between 4.8 and 5.2 volts?

Yes

•Go To 7

No

•Go To 9

No

•Repair the (K24) CKP Sensor Signal circuit for a short to voltage.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



7.CHECK THE (K925) SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector.

CAUTION:
Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis.

3. Connect the Adapter, GPEC Diagnostic 10436 .

4. Measure the resistance of the (K925) CKP Sensor Ground circuit between the CKP Sensor harness connector and the GPEC Adaptor.

Is the resistance below 3.0 Ohms?

Yes

•Go To 8

No

•Repair the (K925) CKP Sensor Ground circuit for an open or high resistance.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



8.TONE WHEEL/PULSE RING INSPECTION

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the battery ground cable.

3. Remove the CKP Sensor. (Refer to 14 - Fuel System/Fuel Injection/SENSOR, Crankshaft Position/Removal) .

4. Visually inspect the sensor mounting location for damage, foreign material.

5. Rotate the engine and if possible inspect the target wheel for any signs of damage.

Were any problems found?

Yes

•Repair Issues in mounting location. Repair or replace the Tone Wheel/Pulse Ring as necessary. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Replace the Crank Position Sensor in accordance with the Service Information. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



9.CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO GROUND

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector.

3. Check for continuity between ground and the (K24) CKP Signal circuit at the Crankshaft Position Sensor harness connector.

Is there continuity between ground and the (K24) CKP Signal circuit?

Yes

•Repair the (K24) CKP Signal circuit for a short to ground.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 10



10. CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE

CAUTION:
Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis.

1. Connect the Adapter, GPEC Diagnostic 10436 .

2. Measure the resistance of the (K24) CKP Signal circuit between the Crankshaft Position Sensor harness connector and the GPEC Adaptor.

Is the resistance below 3.0 Ohms?

Yes

•Go To 11

No

•Repair the (K24) CKP Signal circuit for an open circuit or high resistance.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



11.CHECK RELATED PCM AND COMPONENT CONNECTIONS

1. Perform any Service Bulletins that apply.

2. Disconnect all PCM harness connectors.

3. Disconnect all related in-line harness connections (if equipped).

4. Disconnect the related component harness connectors.

5. Inspect harness connectors, component connectors, and all male and female terminals for the following conditions:
•Proper connector installation.
•Damaged connector locks.
•Corrosion.
•Other signs of water intrusion.
•Weather seal damage (if equipped).
•Bent terminals.
•Overheating due to a poor connection (terminal may be discolored due to excessive current draw).
•Terminals that have been pushed back into the connector cavity.
•Check for spread terminals and verify proper terminal tension.

Repair any conditions that are found.

6. Reconnect all PCM harness connectors. Be certain that all harness connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

7. Reconnect all in-line harness connectors (if equipped). Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

8. Reconnect all related component harness connectors. Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

9. With the scan tool, erase DTCs.

10. Test drive or operate the vehicle in accordance with the when monitored and set conditions.

11. With the scan tool, read DTCs.

Is the DTC active or pending?

Yes

•Replace the Powertrain Control Module in accordance with the Service information. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/MODULE, Powertrain Control - Removal) .
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).
•Test complete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Whenever you see the word intermittent in a code description, that means almost always a wiring or connector problem. Check the wiring using the diagnostic tree below before buying anything. If you are intimidated by electrical problems, take it somewhere. If you feel like buying the sensor anyway before checking the wiring, don't buy the sensor at a part store. Part store sensors are all made in China and will likely not work new from the box or fail very soon.

28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics / MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM), 2.4L / Diagnosis and Testing

P0339-CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT
View attachment 128533
Theory of Operation

The Crankshaft Position (CKP) Sensor circuits consist of a Powertrain Control Module (PCM) supplied 5-Volt reference circuit, low reference circuit and an output signal circuit. The CKP Sensor is an internally magnetic biased digital output integrated circuit sensing device. The sensor detects magnetic flux changes between the peaks and valleys of a tone wheel on the crankshaft. Each tooth on the tone wheel is evenly spaced with missing teeth used as a reference gap. The CKP Sensor produces an ON/OFF DC voltage of varying frequency, reference output pulses per crankshaft revolution. The frequency of the CKP Sensor output depends on the velocity of the crankshaft. The CKP Sensor sends a digital signal to the PCM , which represents an image of the crankshaft tone wheel. The PCM uses each CKP signal pulse to determine crankshaft speed and decodes the crankshaft tone wheel reference gap to identify crankshaft position. This information is then used to sequence the ignition timing and fuel injection events for the engine. The PCM also uses CKP Sensor output information to determine the crankshaft position relative to the camshaft. This information is used to identify cylinder misfires and to control the CMP actuator if equipped.

When Monitored and Set Conditions

When Monitored: This diagnostic runs continuously when the following conditions are met:

•With the engine cranking or running.

Set Conditions:

•The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects that Crankshaft Position Sensor (CKP) Sensor Signal has been lost four times within eight crankshaft revolutions.

Default Actions:

•The MIL light will illuminate.

Possible Causes

5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT
CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CKP SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE
CRANKSHAFT POSITION SENSOR
POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM)

Always perform the Pre-Diagnostic Troubleshooting procedure before proceeding. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

1.CHECK FOR APPLICABLE SERVICE BULLETIN

1. Check for any applicable Service Bulletins that may apply for this issue.

Were any Service Bulletins applicable?

Yes

•Perform the applicable Service Bulletin. Erase the DTC and perform the verification test.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 2



2.CHECK FOR AN ACTIVE DTC

NOTE: Diagnose and repair any 5-volt reference DTCs before continuing with this test procedure.

1. Turn the ignition on.

2. With the scan tool, read DTCs and record on the repair order.

3. Start the engine, or crank the engine for 10 seconds.

NOTE:
If the vehicle starts and runs, wiggle test the wiring and see if problem duplicates or the fault sets.

Is the DTC active or pending?

Yes

•Go To 5

No

•Go To 3



3.WIRE HARNESS/CKP SENSOR INSPECTION

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the harness connectors at the PCM and Crank Sensor and inspect for wire chaffing or rub conditions, terminals pushed out on the wiring connector, bent terminals at the PCM and Crank Sensor, water in the connector cavities, presence of corrosion on the terminals of the connectors or components.

3. Visually inspect the mounting area of Crank Sensor for debris/damage or a loose sensor. Remove the Crank Sensor and inspect the end of the sensor for signs of damage or debris. Rotate the engine and if possible, inspect the target wheel for any signs of damage. Reinstall the Crank Sensor and ensure that the sensor is properly installed and torqued to proper specification.

NOTE:
Due to the fact that this DTC is set by an intermittent loss of the signal, the most likely cause is a poor connection at the Crank Sensor or PCM terminals, or a poor signal between the Crank Sensor and target wheel. Because of this, unplugging and reconnecting the harness connectors, or repositioning the Crank Sensor will often repair the condition that set the DTC.

Were any problems found?

Yes

•Perform the appropriate repair.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 4



4.CHECK THE VEHICLE’S REPAIR HISTORY

1. Check the history of the vehicle for previous crank sensor related DTCs within the past 90 days.

Did the repair history show that the vehicle was in dealership for a crank sensor fault within the past 90 days?

Yes

•Replace the Crank Sensor in accordance with the Service Information. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Test complete. Reconnect the harness connectors, and erase the DTC. The most likely cause was a poor connection at one of the harness connectors. Verify the DTC does not return.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



5.CHECK THE (F855) 5-VOLT SUPPLY CIRCUIT VOLTAGE

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the CKP Sensor harness connector.

3. Turn the ignition on.

4. Measure the voltage on the (F855) 5-Volt Supply circuit at the CKP Sensor harness connector.

Is the voltage between 4.8 and 5.2 volts?

Yes

•Go To 6

No, voltage is below 4.8 volts:

•Repair the 5-Volt Supply circuit for an open or short to ground.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No, voltage is above 5.2 volts:

•Repair the 5-Volt Supply circuit for a short to voltage.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



6.CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT VOLTAGE

1. Measure the voltage on the (K24) CKP Signal circuit at the CKP Sensor harness connector.

Is the voltage between 4.8 and 5.2 volts?

Yes

•Go To 7

No

•Go To 9

No

•Repair the (K24) CKP Sensor Signal circuit for a short to voltage.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



7.CHECK THE (K925) SENSOR GROUND CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector.

CAUTION:
Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis.

3. Connect the Adapter, GPEC Diagnostic 10436 .

4. Measure the resistance of the (K925) CKP Sensor Ground circuit between the CKP Sensor harness connector and the GPEC Adaptor.

Is the resistance below 3.0 Ohms?

Yes

•Go To 8

No

•Repair the (K925) CKP Sensor Ground circuit for an open or high resistance.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



8.TONE WHEEL/PULSE RING INSPECTION

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the battery ground cable.

3. Remove the CKP Sensor. (Refer to 14 - Fuel System/Fuel Injection/SENSOR, Crankshaft Position/Removal) .

4. Visually inspect the sensor mounting location for damage, foreign material.

5. Rotate the engine and if possible inspect the target wheel for any signs of damage.

Were any problems found?

Yes

•Repair Issues in mounting location. Repair or replace the Tone Wheel/Pulse Ring as necessary. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Replace the Crank Position Sensor in accordance with the Service Information. The “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure must be performed every time there has been a repair/replacement made to a CMP Sensor and/or CKP sensor, flywheel, valvetrain, timing chain or gears. Failure to do so can cause a misfire fault to set. With the scan tool, perform the “Cam/Crank Relearn” Procedure.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



9.CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO GROUND

1. Turn the ignition off.

2. Disconnect the PCM C2 harness connector.

3. Check for continuity between ground and the (K24) CKP Signal circuit at the Crankshaft Position Sensor harness connector.

Is there continuity between ground and the (K24) CKP Signal circuit?

Yes

•Repair the (K24) CKP Signal circuit for a short to ground.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Go To 10



10. CHECK THE (K24) CKP SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE

CAUTION:
Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install the GPEC Diagnostic Adaptor to perform the diagnosis.

1. Connect the Adapter, GPEC Diagnostic 10436 .

2. Measure the resistance of the (K24) CKP Signal circuit between the Crankshaft Position Sensor harness connector and the GPEC Adaptor.

Is the resistance below 3.0 Ohms?

Yes

•Go To 11

No

•Repair the (K24) CKP Signal circuit for an open circuit or high resistance.
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).



11.CHECK RELATED PCM AND COMPONENT CONNECTIONS

1. Perform any Service Bulletins that apply.

2. Disconnect all PCM harness connectors.

3. Disconnect all related in-line harness connections (if equipped).

4. Disconnect the related component harness connectors.

5. Inspect harness connectors, component connectors, and all male and female terminals for the following conditions:
•Proper connector installation.
•Damaged connector locks.
•Corrosion.
•Other signs of water intrusion.
•Weather seal damage (if equipped).
•Bent terminals.
•Overheating due to a poor connection (terminal may be discolored due to excessive current draw).
•Terminals that have been pushed back into the connector cavity.
•Check for spread terminals and verify proper terminal tension.

Repair any conditions that are found.

6. Reconnect all PCM harness connectors. Be certain that all harness connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

7. Reconnect all in-line harness connectors (if equipped). Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

8. Reconnect all related component harness connectors. Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged.

9. With the scan tool, erase DTCs.

10. Test drive or operate the vehicle in accordance with the when monitored and set conditions.

11. With the scan tool, read DTCs.

Is the DTC active or pending?

Yes

•Replace the Powertrain Control Module in accordance with the Service information. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/MODULE, Powertrain Control - Removal) .
•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).

No

•Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).
•Test complete.
where do u find information like this? I Kept finding generic results, I will be looking into the issue myself and also won't be buying anything yet, Thank you. also i'm currently only using the OBDLink app, what would the benefit be to using AflaOBD?
 

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The alfaOBD android app will let you access all the electronic modules like ABS, and air bags. Any B (Body), C (Chassis), or U (Network) that cheap bluetooth scanners won't see, your alfa app and your android device will see. If you want to pull your PIN so you can program a fob, alfa will do that as well. When you know what codes are, even if you know nothing about diagnosing a problem, an unscrupulous mechanic will think twice about ripping you off.
The info I post is from the FSM (Factory Service Manual) and over 58 years of being my own mechanic.
 

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Periodically I get a hard jar while heavily accelerating, usually when merging onto the highway or similar. Followed by limp shutting the car off and on limp is cleared and driving for a couple days clears the code. I've had it happen once 6 months ago and just recently twice. Is that sensor something that could be cleaned or should I replace or consider something else?

Thanks in advance.
Change the SPARK PLUGS and get a PROPER GAP. Start there....
 
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