18" wheels PSI
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    18" wheels PSI

    This is a discussion on 18" wheels PSI within the Dodge Dart Wheels and Tires forums, part of the Dodge Dart Garage - The Mopar Zone category; Quick question my cars build had the 225/45/17 I had the dealer switch to the 18s 225/40/18 My door sticker is listed at 225/45/17 and ...

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    Thread: 18" wheels PSI

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      18" wheels PSI

      Quick question my cars build had the 225/45/17
      I had the dealer switch to the 18s 225/40/18
      My door sticker is listed at 225/45/17 and 34 PSI all 4
      what is the door sticker say for cars with the 18" wheels ?
      Thanks

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      Quote Originally Posted by antman27 View Post
      Quick question my cars build had the 225/45/17
      I had the dealer switch to the 18s 225/40/18
      My door sticker is listed at 225/45/17 and 34 PSI all 4
      what is the door sticker say for cars with the 18" wheels ?
      Thanks
      No the 18s have 38PSI up front, and 34 PSI in the rear.
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      @antman27 , it's all personal preference with how one run's PSI's. With regards to stock PSI for the 225/40/18's you can run 34 PSI just fine. You can also run 36 PSI, which is what a lot of the euro guys run with that wheel/tire setup. Depending on your environment and climate, right now you would want to run a higher PSI if you are dealing with snow or winter weather. However, if you are located in warmer climates; you'd run a lower PSI.

      Again, there is no true "pure" PSI. It's all personal preference coupled and dictated by the climate equaling how you want the ride to feel.
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      Quote Originally Posted by youngsmith53 View Post
      @antman27 , it's all personal preference with how one run's PSI's. With regards to stock PSI for the 225/40/18's you can run 34 PSI just fine. You can also run 36 PSI, which is what a lot of the euro guys run with that wheel/tire setup. Depending on your environment and climate, right now you would want to run a higher PSI if you are dealing with snow or winter weather. However, if you are located in warmer climates; you'd run a lower PSI.

      Again, there is no true "pure" PSI. It's all personal preference coupled and dictated by the climate equaling how you want the ride to feel.
      Ahhh Thanks I thought I read someplace to run a lower PSI in snow . sort of like a 4x4 in sand runs lower psi

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      Quote Originally Posted by antman27 View Post
      Ahhh Thanks I thought I read someplace to run a lower PSI in snow . sort of like a 4x4 in sand runs lower psi
      Look at it this way, low is slippery and higher is better. You want to have a "narrow" type tire in the snow, and increasing the PSI will give the "narrow" effect. If you have a low PSI you are going to make a bigger contact patch in the snow which is something you don't want (IE: ice climbing shoes, with the tiny sole picks digging in vs tennis shoes). Also, if you are running lower PSI's in the snow you are more or less "floating" on top of the snow, where if you are running a higher PSI you are sinking the tires into the snow providing more grip and traction with the snow. You don't want to be floating on the snow or other winter weather, you want to sink in an obtain grip. You want to get through the snow, to the ground, to the road for your best chance of traction.

      Simply put... More weight concentrated in one area = more chance of traction. The way you get more weight concentrated onto one area is with higher pressure.

      Below is just one of the common practices for winter weather driving. I'll give tirerack credit as they make it easy and they don't complicate when it comes to their ideologies on the what and why's of tires. Either way, it's best to leave the whole article here for the .org masses...
      ____
      Higher Tire Pressures for Winter Driving
      credit: Winter Tech Information - Higher Tire Pressures for Winter Driving

      Several vehicle manufacturer's owner's manuals recommend operating winter tires several psi (typically 3-5) higher than their recommended pressures for summer and all-season tires. While none of them actually provide the reason why, there are several scenarios that would support the practice.

      First and foremost is that winter tires feature more aggressive tread designs, softer tread compounds and are often molded with deeper beginning tread depths than summer or all-season tires. While the combination of these design elements allows winter tires to remain more pliable in sub-freezing temperatures to provide more traction in snow and on ice, it often results in tires that have somewhat reduced responsiveness to driver input. The 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressures increase tire stability and help offset the reduction in responsiveness.

      Additionally ambient air temperatures in winter typically range 40- to 50-degrees Fahrenheit colder than typical summer temperatures for the same location. The lower ambient temperatures allow tires to be more efficient at radiating heat and the tires will run cooler, building up less hot tire pressure. In this case, the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced hot tire pressures resulting from less heat buildup.

      And finally, all tire pressures are intended to be measured cold, which means when the tires are at the same temperature as the air outside. Unfortunately, unless you park your vehicle outside or in an unheated, detached garage, and measure its tire pressures first thing on dark, cold mornings, the influence of attached garages or higher ambient air temperatures later in the day often means that drivers are actually measuring tires that are not completely cold. In this case the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced tire pressures associated with the conditions in which the tire pressures are typically measured.
      ____
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      Quote Originally Posted by youngsmith53 View Post
      Look at it this way, low is slippery and higher is better. You want to have a "narrow" type tire in the snow, and increasing the PSI will give the "narrow" effect. If you have a low PSI you are going to make a bigger contact patch in the snow which is something you don't want (IE: ice climbing shoes, with the tiny sole picks digging in vs tennis shoes). Also, if you are running lower PSI's in the snow you are more or less "floating" on top of the snow, where if you are running a higher PSI you are sinking the tires into the snow providing more grip and traction with the snow. You don't want to be floating on the snow or other winter weather, you want to sink in an obtain grip. You want to get through the snow, to the ground, to the road for your best chance of traction.

      Simply put... More weight concentrated in one area = more chance of traction. The way you get more weight concentrated onto one area is with higher pressure.

      Below is just one of the common practices for winter weather driving. I'll give tirerack credit as they make it easy and they don't complicate when it comes to their ideologies on the what and why's of tires. Either way, it's best to leave the whole article here for the .org masses...
      ____
      Higher Tire Pressures for Winter Driving
      credit: Winter Tech Information - Higher Tire Pressures for Winter Driving

      Several vehicle manufacturer's owner's manuals recommend operating winter tires several psi (typically 3-5) higher than their recommended pressures for summer and all-season tires. While none of them actually provide the reason why, there are several scenarios that would support the practice.

      First and foremost is that winter tires feature more aggressive tread designs, softer tread compounds and are often molded with deeper beginning tread depths than summer or all-season tires. While the combination of these design elements allows winter tires to remain more pliable in sub-freezing temperatures to provide more traction in snow and on ice, it often results in tires that have somewhat reduced responsiveness to driver input. The 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressures increase tire stability and help offset the reduction in responsiveness.

      Additionally ambient air temperatures in winter typically range 40- to 50-degrees Fahrenheit colder than typical summer temperatures for the same location. The lower ambient temperatures allow tires to be more efficient at radiating heat and the tires will run cooler, building up less hot tire pressure. In this case, the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced hot tire pressures resulting from less heat buildup.

      And finally, all tire pressures are intended to be measured cold, which means when the tires are at the same temperature as the air outside. Unfortunately, unless you park your vehicle outside or in an unheated, detached garage, and measure its tire pressures first thing on dark, cold mornings, the influence of attached garages or higher ambient air temperatures later in the day often means that drivers are actually measuring tires that are not completely cold. In this case the 3-5 psi higher recommended inflation pressure increase helps offset the reduced tire pressures associated with the conditions in which the tire pressures are typically measured.
      ____
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      Quote Originally Posted by antman27 View Post
      Ahhh Thanks I thought I read someplace to run a lower PSI in snow . sort of like a 4x4 in sand runs lower psi
      That only applies for off-road vehicles. Lower psi flattens the tire making it harder to sink. This is useful for sand and DEEP snow. Taking a 4x4 truck through 4 feet of snow in the Sierra Nevada mountains requires single digit PSI pressure.

      For street applications like a daily driver, you want a narrow tire to dig through the snow and hit pavement.

     

     

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